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Patriotic Readings

BY

JASPER L. McBRIEN, A, M.

FORMER STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION OF NEBRASKA,
AND NOW SCHOOL EXTENSION SPECIALIST FOR THE UNITED

STATES BUREAU OF EDUCATION, WASHINGTON, D. C.

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FOREWORD

AMERICA FIRST was the central thought in President Wilson's address to the Daughters of the American Revolution on the twenty-fifth anniversary of their organization-their Silver Jubilee—in Washington, D. C., October 11, 1915. The president declared in this address that all citizens should make it plain whether their sympathies for foreign countries come before their love of the United States, or whether they are for America first, last, and all the time. He asserted, also, that our people need all of their patriotism in this confusion of tongues in which we find ourselves over the European war.

The press throughout the country has taken up the thought of the President and, seconded by the efforts of the Bureau of Education, has done loyal work in making “America First” our national slogan. This is all good so far as it goes—especially among the adult population, many of whom must be educated, if educated at all, on the run. But the rising generation, both native-born and foreign, to get the full meaning of this slogan in its far-reaching significance, must have time for study and reflection along patriotic lines. There must be the right material on which the American youth may settle their thoughts for a definite end in patriotism if our country is to have a new birth of freedom and if “this government of the people, by the people, and for the people is not to perish from

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