The Poetical Works of Anna Seward: With Extracts from Her Literary Correspondence, Volume 2

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J. Ballantyne and Company, 1810
 

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Page 48 - Tis not his sails ! — thy husband comes no more ! His bones now whiten an accursed shore ! — Retire, — for hark ! the sea-gull shrieking soars. The lurid atmosphere portentous...
Page 151 - The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise. To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air ? He who of those delights can judge, and spare To interpose them oft, is not unwise.
Page 151 - Where shall we sometimes meet, and by the fire Help waste a sullen day, what may be won From the hard season gaining? Time will run On smoother, till Favonius reinspire The frozen earth, and clothe in fresh attire The lily and rose, that neither sowed nor spun. What neat repast shall feast us, light and choice, Of Attic taste, with wine, whence we may rise To hear the lute well touched, or artful voice Warble immortal notes and Tuscan air?
Page 36 - Mid the pale summer of the polar skies ? — li wot Humanity! — on coasts unknown, The shiv'ring natives of the frozen zone. And the swart Indian, as he faintly strays ' Where Cancer reddens in the solar blaze,' She bade him seek ; — on each inclement shore Plant the rich seeds of her exhaustless store; Unite the savage hearts, and hostile hands, In the firm compact of her gentle bands ; Strew her soft comforts o'er the barren plain, Sing her sweet lays, and consecrate her fane.
Page 79 - I have a mother and three sisters, to whom the value of my commission would be an object, as the loss of Grenada has much affected their income. It is needless to be more explicit on this subject ; I am persuaded of your Excellency's goodness.
Page 106 - I have now completely subdued my aversion to the profession of a merchant, and hope in time to acquire an inclination for it ; yet God forbid I should ever love what I am to make the object of my attention ! — that vile trash, which I care not for, but only as it may be the future means of procuring the blessing of my soul. Thus all my mercantile calculations go to the tune of dear Honora. When an impertinent consciousness whispers in my ear that I am not of the right stuff for a merchant, 1 draw...
Page 97 - ... Marlborough brandishing a truncheon upon a sign-post, surrounded with types and emblems, and canopied with cornucopias that disembogue their stores upon his head ; Mercuries reclined upon bales of goods ; Genii playing with pens, ink, and paper ; while, in perspective, his gorgeous vessels, " launched on the bosom of the silver Thames," are wafting to distant lands the produce of this commercial nation.
Page 96 - ... else I should keep him aloof, for his heart is formed of those affectionate materials, so dear to the ingenuous taste of Julia and her Honora. I sympathize in your resentment against the canonical Dons, who stumpify the heads of those good green people, beneath whose friendly shade so many of your happiest hours have glided away, — but they defy them; let them stumpify as much as they please, time will repair the mischief, — their verdant arms will again extend, and invite you to their shelter....
Page 153 - The verses were deposited in an antique Etruscan vase, and were drawn out by gentlemen appointed to read them aloud, and to judge of their rival merits. These gentlemen, ignorant of the authors, selected three poems from the collection which they thought most worthy of the three Myrtle Wreaths decreed as the rewards and honours of the day. The names of the persons who had obtained the prizes were then announced by Lady Miller.
Page 91 - I can well conceive the emotions of joy which their first appearance, from the neighbouring hills, excites after absence ; they seem to welcome you home, and invite you to reiterate those hours of happiness, of which they are a species of monument. I shall have an eternal love and reverence for them. Never shall I forget the joy that danced in Honora's eyes, when she first showed them to me from Needwood Forest on our return with you from Buxton to Lichfield.

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