King Richard the Second: With Introduction and Notes, Explanatory and Critical, for Use in Schools and Classes

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Ginn & Company, 1894 - 181 pages
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Page 70 - This blessed plot, this earth, this realm, this England, This nurse, this teeming womb of royal kings, Fear'd by their breed and famous by their birth, Renowned for their deeds as far from home, For Christian service and true chivalry, As is the sepulchre in stubborn Jewry Of the world's ransom, blessed Mary's Son, This land of such dear souls, this dear dear land, Dear for her reputation through the world...
Page 111 - See, see, King Richard doth himself appear, As doth the blushing discontented sun From out the fiery portal of the east, When he perceives the envious clouds are bent To dim his glory and to stain the track Of his bright passage to the Occident.
Page 105 - All murder'd: for within the hollow crown That rounds the mortal temples of a king Keeps Death his court; and there the antic sits, Scoffing his state and grinning at his pomp...
Page 105 - Let's choose executors and talk of wills : And yet not so — for what can we bequeath Save our deposed bodies to the ground? Our lands, our lives, and all are Bolingbroke's, And nothing can we call our own but death, And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones.
Page 105 - And nothing can we call our own but death And that small model of the barren earth Which serves as paste and cover to our bones. For God's sake, let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the death of kings...
Page 46 - And I resign my gage. My dear dear lord, The purest treasure mortal times afford, Is spotless reputation ; that away, Men are but gilded loam, or painted clay.
Page 106 - Cover your heads, and mock not flesh and blood With solemn reverence : throw away respect, Tradition, form, and ceremonious duty, For you have but mistook me all this while: I live with bread like you, feel want, Taste grief, need friends: subjected thus, How can you say to me I am a king?
Page 155 - Ha, ha ! keep time : — how sour sweet music is, When time is broke and no proportion kept ! So is it in the music of men's lives.
Page 172 - God's sake let us sit upon the ground And tell sad stories of the death of kings! How some have been deposed, some slain in war, Some haunted by the ghosts they have deposed, Some poisoned by their wives, some sleeping killed All murdered...
Page 126 - Venice, gave His body to that pleasant country's earth. And his pure soul unto his captain Christ, Under whose colours he had fought so long.

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