The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 45

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Atlantic Monthly Company, 1880 - American literature
 

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Page 474 - Singing of Mount Abora. Could I revive within me Her symphony and song, To such a deep delight 'twould win me That with music loud and long, I would build that dome in air, That sunny dome!
Page 19 - To understand political power aright, and derive it from its original, we must consider what state all men are naturally in, and that is a state of perfect freedom to order their actions and dispose of their possessions and persons as they think fit, within the bounds of the law of nature, without asking leave, or depending upon the will of any other man.
Page 236 - Magnificent The morning rose, in memorable pomp, Glorious as e'er I had beheld — in front, The sea lay laughing at a distance; near, The solid mountains shone, bright as the clouds, Grain-tinctured, drenched in empyrean light; And in the meadows and the lower grounds Was all the sweetness of a common dawn — Dews, vapours, and the melody of birds, And labourers going forth to till the fields.
Page 198 - EPICURUS'S old questions are yet unanswered. Is he willing to prevent evil, but not able ? then is he impotent. Is he able, but not willing ? then is he malevolent. Is he both able and willing ? whence then is evil ? You ascribe, CLEANTHES, (and I believe justly) a purpose and intention to Nature.
Page 20 - Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness — That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Power from the Consent of the Governed...
Page 103 - In the first place, as he is the father of English poetry, so I hold him in the same degree of veneration as the Grecians held Homer, or the Romans Virgil. He is a perpetual fountain of good sense; learned in all sciences, -and therefore speaks properly on all subjects...
Page 91 - Let us make our generation one of the strongest and brightest links in that golden chain, which is destined, I fondly believe, to grapple the people of all the States to this Constitution, for ages to come.
Page 192 - The world stands trembling at his throne ! While each pale sinner hung his head, Jove, nodding, shook the heavens, and said : " Offending race of human kind, By nature, reason, learning, blind ; You who, through frailty, stepp'd aside ; And you, who never fell from pride : You who in different sects were shamm'd, And come to see each other damn'd...
Page 455 - Her lips were red; and one was thin Compared to that was next her chin, Some bee had stung it newly: But, Dick, her eyes so guard her face, I durst no more upon them gaze Than on the sun in July.
Page 128 - Romance, was chiefly valuable to him as affording a sort of poetic or fairy precinct, where actualities would not be so terribly insisted upon as they are, and must needs be, in America.

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