Clio and the Poets: Augustan Poetry and the Traditions of Ancient Historiography

Front Cover
David Levene, Nelis
BRILL, Oct 26, 2001 - Literary Criticism - 396 pages
In this book seventeen leading scholars examine the interaction between historiography and poetry in the Augustan age: how poets drew on — or reacted against — historians’ presentation of the world, and how, conversely, historians transformed poetic themes for their own ends.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1 Clio exclusa
1
2 Propertius the Historian 33112?
25
Augustan Victory and Defeat in Vergil and Tacitus
45
Repetition and Sacrifice in the Boxing Match in Aeneid 5
61
5 Archaism and Historicism in Horaces Odes
81
Historiography in Horaces Odes
103
Ethnography and Politics in Firstcentury Rome
123
8 Roman Archaeology in Vergils Arcadia Vergil Eclogue 4 Aeneid 8 Livy 1 7
143
13 Epic Encounters? Ancient Historical Battle Narratives and the Epic Tradition
253
14 The Structure of Livys First Pentad and the Augustan Poetry Book
275
Ovids Fasti and Plutarchs Life of Numa
291
16 The Extinction of the Potitii and the Sacred History of Augustan Rome
313
17 History Poetry and Annates
331
Bibliography
363
Index of passages discussed
381
General Index
388

9 Ovids Metamorphoses and Universal History
163
10 The Historian in Ovid The Roman History of Metamorphoses 1415
191
an Ovidian Catalogue and its Historiographical Models
211
Between Tradition and Genre
231
List of Contributors
395
SUPPLEMENTS TO MNEMOSYNE
397
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

D.S. Levene, Ph.D. (1989) in Classics, University of Oxford, is Professor of Latin Language and Literature at the University of Leeds. He has published a variety of works on Latin historiography and rhetoric, including "Religion in Livy" (Brill, 1993). D.P. Nelis, Ph.D. (1988) in Classics, Queen's University of Belfast, is Professor of Latin at Trinity College Dublin. He is the author of "Vergil and Apollonius: the Aeneid and the Argonautica" (Leeds 2001).

Bibliographic information