Annual Report, Volume 3

Front Cover
Westbote Company, state printers, 1888 - Forests and forestry
1887 includes: Trees and tree planting, with exercises and directions for the celebration of arbor day. Prepared by John B. Pesslee, superintendent of Cincinnati public schools, with a preface by Warren Higley.
 

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Page 47 - THE groves were God's first temples. Ere man learned To hew the shaft, and lay the architrave. And spread the roof above them, — ere he framed The lofty vault, to gather and roll back The sound of anthems ; in the darkling wood, Amidst the cool and silence, he knelt down, And offered to the Mightiest solemn thanks And supplication.
Page 61 - Twelve years have elapsed since I last took a view Of my favourite field, and the bank where they grew ; And now in the grass behold they are laid, And the tree is my seat that once lent me a shade. The blackbird has fled to another retreat, Where the hazels afford him a screen from the heat...
Page 59 - Oh, spare that aged oak Now towering to the skies! When but an idle boy, I sought its grateful shade; In all their gushing joy Here, too, my sisters played. My mother kissed me here; My father pressed my hand— Forgive this foolish tear, But let that old oak stand. My heart-strings round thee cling, Close as thy bark, old friend! Here shall the wild-bird sing, And still thy branches bend. Old tree! the storm still brave! And, woodman, leave the spot; While I've a hand to save, Thy axe shall harm...
Page 50 - And, when the sun begins to fling His flaring beams, me, goddess, bring To arched walks of twilight groves, And shadows brown, that Sylvan loves...
Page 59 - Woodman, spare that tree ! Touch not a single bough ! In youth it sheltered me, And I'll protect it now.
Page 57 - A prayer-book now shall be my looking-glass, In which I will adore sweet virtue's face. Here dwell no hateful looks, no palace cares, No broken vows dwell here, nor pale-faced fears...
Page 63 - The Laurell, meed of mightie Conquerours And Poets sage; the Firre that weepeth still: The Willow, worne of forlorne Paramours; The Eugh, obedient to the benders will; The Birch for shaftes; the Sallow for the mill; The Mirrhe...
Page 61 - I care not how men trace their ancestry, To ape or Adam ; let them please their whim ; But I in June am midway to believe A tree among my far progenitors, Such sympathy is mine with all the race, Such mutual recognition vaguely sweet There is between us.
Page 57 - A SONG to the oak, the brave old oak, Who hath ruled in the greenwood long; Here's health and renown to his broad green crown, And his fifty arms so strong. There's fear in his frown when the sun goes down, And the fire in the west fades out; And he showeth his might on a wild midnight, When the storms through his branches shout. Then here's to the oak, the brave old oak...
Page 60 - s there enjoyed, All men would to my gardens throng, And leave the cities void. In my plot no tulips blow, — Snow-loving pines and oaks instead ; And rank the savage maples grow From Spring's faint flush to Autumn red. My garden is a forest ledge Which older forests bound ; The banks slope down to the blue lake-edge, Then plunge to depths profound.

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