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KEN'S MYSTERY.-A STORY ..

....Julian Hawthorne 925

LAMBETH PALACE (Illustrated).

Zadel Barnes Gustafson 3

LONDON.-See “ Artistic London.”
LONDON SCBURB, A FAMOUS (Illustrated)...

William H. Rideing 165
MONTEFIORE, SIR MOSES (Illustrated).....

..Zadel Barnes Gustafson 890
MOUNT OF SORROW, THE.--A STORY.....

..Harriet Prescott Spofford 128
NEWBURGH, WASHINGTON'S ARMY AT (Illustrated).

......J. T. Headley 651
NEW YORK, BRITISH EVACUATION OF.........

.II. P. Johnston 900

ILLUSTRATION.

Last Boat-Load of British leaving New York....... 909 George Clinston and Mrs. Clinston.....
Map of New York.....

911

Bull's lead Tavern.......
Old Trinity Churcb, 1783...

912 John Rodgers....
Federal Hall, Wall Street..

915

James Duane...
Map of the Battery in 1783 and 1883.

916 The British Fleet ready to leave New York.....
The Civil Procession.....

917
NEW YORK, GOVERNMENT OF CITIES IN.......

.W. R. Grace 609
NEW YORK, RECENT BUILDING IN (Illustrated)..

. Montgomery Schuyler 557
NICAIS E DE KEYSER (Illustrated)...............

Zadel Barnes Gustafson 688
OBITUARY.-See under “ Editor's Historical Record," above.
ON THE BEACH.-A POEM........

S. S. Conant 544

ON THE EDGE OF THE MARSH.--A POEM......

Miss A. A. Bassett 67

OPERA HOUSE, THE METROPOLITAN (INustrated).

.M. Schuyler 877
PAUL POTTER (Illustrated).....

..E. Mason 538
PRISONERS.-A STORY (IUustrated)..

Rose Hawthorne Lathrop 503, 696
QUESTION, THE.—A POEM.......

Herbert E. Clarke 608
QUITE PRIVATE.-A DRAMATIC SKETCH...

.Mrs D. H. R. Goodale 240
RAILWAYS, TRANSCONTINENTAL.

F. E. Prendergast 936
RIP VAN WINKLE LEGEND, GENESIS OF THE..

J. B. Thompson 617
ROMA NOFFS, THE (Illustrated)...

II. Sutherland Edwards 99, 188
RUS.-A STORY.........

..Charles Reade 94
SCIENCE AND PROGRESS.--See under “ Editor's Historical Record,” above.
SILHOUETTE, A.–A STORY...

. Rebecca Harding Davis 623
SONG.........

..Robert Browning 266
STRANGER, THE.-AN EASTERN LEGEND....

Wallace Bruce 374

SUNLIGHT MYSTERIES..

William C. Wyckoff 81

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Mount Whitney......

The Bolometer in Electric Circuit..

Upper Camp, Mount Whitney.

Origin of Fraunhofer Line......

Rays through Solar Atmosphere.

Normal Spectrum...

Wheatstone's Bridge......

Prismatic Spectrum..

The Bolometer...

“SWAMP FOX,” HAUNTS OF THE (Illustrated)...

.P. D. Hay 545

THY LOVE.-A POEM........

Jenny P. Bigelow 224

TOWN GARDEN, A.--A POEM.....

.Margaret Veley 405

TROTTERS, AMONG THE BLUE-GRASS (Illustrated)...

W. H. Bishop 715

UNUTTERED, A SONNET...

.John B. Tabb 98
UTAH, SAUNTERINGS IN.

Phil Robinson 705

VALLOMBROSA.......

..E. D. R. Bianciardi 347

ILLUSTRATIONS.

A Village Street in Val d'Arno..

347 A grim-looking Building, half Castle, half Farm-

Pelago..

house....

Convent of Vallombrosa....

VERMONT, A VACATION IN..

Herbert Tuttle 813

ILLUSTRATIONS

Mount Mansfield from Stowe...

815

Rock of Terror..

The Nose and Smuggler's Notch.

Smuggler's Notch..

The Mountain Road..

817

Sketches near Stowe.

Mount Washington from Mount Mansfield..

A Marble Quarry.

Old Woman of the Mountains...

819

Sutherland Falls...

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... 818

WAR PICTURES IN TIMES OF PEACE......

.Rufas F. Zogbaum 393

ILLUSTRATIONS.
Head-Piece

393
At the Doctor's.

399

A Corner of the Inn Yard : early Morning..

394

The Patrol....

400

The March in the Rain...

395

The Scout...

401

The Company Kitchen..

396

The Attack

402

The Canteens...

397

The Staff

404

The " Billet de Logement".

39%
WAR, THE HUNDRED YEARS'.

.T. W. Higginson 20

ILLUSTRATIONS.

Death of King Philip....

23

Facsimile from MS. of Father Rasle's Abenaki

Robert Cavelier, Sieur de la Salle...

25

Glossary...

29

Governor Andros and the Boston People...

26 Lonis Joseph Montcalm..

30

Sir William Pepperrell....

28

James Wolfe.

31

WASHINGTON'S ARMY AT NEWBURGH, LAST DAYS OF...

..J. T. Headley 651

ILLUSTRATIONS.

George Washington........

.Frontispiece Old Ellison House........

660

Entrance to Washington's Head-Quarters..

452 Interior of Washington's Head-Quarters....... 661

Washington's Head-Quarters at Newburgh. (53 The Temple.....

662

Martha Washington..

655

lead-Quarters of Generals Knox and Greene..... 663

Vale of Avoca...

656 Washington and his Generals in Consultation...... 665

View southward from Washington's Head-

Beacon-Fires on the Hudson...

667

Quarters....

657 Relics in Washington's Head-Quarters....

670

Washington refusing a Dictatorship.

659
WHY ?-A POEM...

Nora Perry 616
WOMEN, THE EDUCATION OF.....

George Cary Eggleston 292
WOOD-NYMPH, THE.-A SCULPTOR'S ROMANCE.

Tighe Hopkins 770

YACHT, THE MODERN.

..J. D. J. Kelly 441

ILLUSTRATIONS,
Relative Plan of Yacht ** America " and her

Rig of American Sloop..

448
Competitors....

141
Rig of English Cutter....

449
Development of the English Cutter..

143 Relative Dimensions of American Sloop and
Medium American Centre-board Yacht.

English Cutter.....

450
Types of Schooner Yachts...

447

Austin Dobson 908

..S. S. Conant 544

.Edgar Fawcett 935
Francis David Morice 212

T. B. Aldrich 453

Sarah Orne Jewett 924

...S. S. Conant 115

Annie Fields 19

Margaret Veley 405
Philip Bourke Marston 769

Victor Hugo 827
Jenny P. Bigelow 224
Miss A. A. Bassett 67

Herbert E. Clarke 608

.George Edgar Montgomery 114

Robert Browning 266

Wallace Bruce 374

...M. C. Bradley 876

John B. Tabb 98
Herbert E. Clarke 898

Nora Perry 616

NEW MONTHLY MAGAZINE.

No. CCCXCVII.—JUNE, 1883.- VOL. LXVII.

A

LAMBETH PALACE, OR “YE ARCIIBISHOP'S INNE."* RIVER of many springs in its bright rock the archbishop's barge in its old

beginnings among the Cotswold moorings at the palace stairs, which has Hills, of many turnings as it gathers borne so many scholars and prelates bond depth and speed upon its pleasant way and free, so many kings and queens and through lush green fields, with farm- lordly retinues, to and from its portals. houses and sheep and browsing kine, and And it is from the river, from the decks slopes where castles, palaces, and towers of the little steamers speeding by, that its of churches rise between the curving irregular outlines mass in most harmoniopens of the woods ; a river of many ous effect to the eye. bridges too, quaint spans of plank where The history of this stately pile, for upits bed is laid with rushes, ruddy of brick ward of seven centuries the home and the where the mills and weirs wax busy, and official seat of the Archbishops of Cantersombrely grand of well - massed stone bury, is not only the story of the English where the towns have thickened to its Church in its amities and enmities with verges: such is the river Thames, until the Church of Rome; of the archiepiscoat last, wider and swifter and muddier pates of more than fifty primates during much, yet fair with sky hues still, and England's most contentious period of civvery hard worked with every sort of craft il, political, and religious evolution; and that plies for trade or floats for pleasure, in its motley structure a record of the art it comes rushing in to London town, stay- and architectural changes of the ages

that ing its force a little as it nears the walls have produced it; but it is a romance of of beautiful old Lambeth Palace, thence court and cloister as strange in its tragic swirling demurely across to the steps of verities, in the crimes and virtues of its the towers of Parliament, as if it cherish- actors, the splendor and the shadow of its ed recollections of the days when church scenes, as the most improbable of modern and state, when mace and mitre, wrought tales. their decrees in the jealous intimacy of Its Saxon name, originally spelled Lammuch conflicting lust of power; then hur- hethe or Lamehithe, signified “dirty starying on beneath the arches of Westmin- tion,” which it must have been before the ster Bridge to join its crowded water life present Thames Embankment was built. to the crowded shore life of certainly the One spelling, Lambhyd, “or lambs' harlargest, perhaps the loveliest, surely the bor," had apparently no other foundation saddest, city in the world.

than that of an æsthetic impulse shrinkIn describing the palace of Lambeth it is ing from the former meaning. natural to speak, and even to speak first, In very early times Lambeth was a royof this fine river, still flowing so near it, al manor—the Saxon kings lived there, which used to wash its very walls, and and it was part of the estate of the Count

ess Goda, sister of Edward the Confessor. It is a pleasure to publicly acknowledge my

It changed hands during the Saxon-Dandebt to His Grace the late Archbishop of Canterbury ish wars, but later came to its own again. and his family for their kind attention and courtesy; There is no certain account of what Goda's to bishops and canons of the English Church for palace was like, but discussion and deeds valuable information ; to the officials of the British Museum, especially to Mr. C. 1. Coote and Mr. J. P. of conveyance show that it stood on the Andersen, and to Miss Frances Hays, who most kind. present site of Lambeth. ly assisted me in my researches. Z. B. G. As a home for the archbishops, Lam

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1883, by Harper and Brothers, in the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

VOL. LXVII.-No. 397.-1

beth, in those days out of the see of Can- | 28th of May, 1533, while this most woterbury-was a kind of protest on the part manly wife and queen was still living, of the English Church against the Church the marriage of her faithless husband of Rome, and the initiative in this reces- with the Lady Anne Boleyn was confirmsion was taken by Archbishop Baldwin, ed by Cranmer—that same Cranmer who who could not get on” with the monks gave to the clergy the oath assigning the of Canterbury, and chose, with the coun- royal succession to her heirs, yet only tenance of Henry II., a site at Hacking-two years later, when seated judicially in ton, where he could bring around him a the under-chapel (crypt) of the palace, chapter of canons apart from them. This annulled the marriage itself, having artscheme had the favor df a papal bull, but fully tempted the captive and already jealousy quickly got that revoked, and at sentenced queen to avow some just and Baldwin's death the monks pulled down lawful impediment to her marriage with his chapel.

the king," in the hope of avoiding the Some years later Lambeth—“there be- stake for herself and her adherents. From ing reserved only a small piece of land that dark crypt the miserable young sufficient to erect a mansion for the Bish- queen, dishonored by the king, betrayed ops of Rochester whenever they came to by her highest earthly spiritual adviser, Parliament”– became by legal process of and forced to affirm in her own disgrace exchange the sole property of the see of the disinheritance of her offspring, went Canterbury, and a successor of Archbish- forth only to the scaffold, and the third op Baldwin, about 1197, began to rebuild day after her beheading, her maid, Jane thereon. Once more the froward cowls Seymour, took her place as the wife of of Canterbury drew down on this design Henry VIII. three successive papal anathemas, but It is strange reading that in the very though his work was destroyed, the arch-next year (1537), by virtue of the Royal bishop staid on at Lambeth without his Commission, various conventions of the college and canons; and that, after its archbishops and bishops were held at final transfer to the see of Canterbury, Lambeth to “devise the Godly and Pious Lambeth was the fixed dwelling of the Disposition of a Christian Man," known primates is plain from the consecutive to history as the Bishops' Book. record of their activities. It is believed And it seems not so inscrutable as many that the consecration of Thomas à Becket of the so-called acts of Divine Providence took place here, and that as many as five that these meetings should have been dishundred consecrations occurred between persed by the plague, “persons dying even the archiepiscopates of Warham and Sum- at the palace gate.' That strange man, ner, and though these ceremonies now the eighth Henry, once came in his barge more frequently occur in the Abbey, St. to the foot of the "Water Tower," and callPaul's, and elsewhere, Lambeth Palace is ed his tool Cranmer down the stairs to not less the original centre of Anglican tell him of certain plottings of Bishop Church life.” Among accounts of many Gardiner and other of Cranmer's enemies, feasts and assemblies are details of two and put him in the way of triumpbing very large conventions of church, state, over them. university, and law dignitaries banquet- Among other royal visitors of the past ing most luxuriously at “ye Archbishop's have been Queen Mary, who often called Inne” at Lambeth in 1408 and 1446; for on her favorite Cardinal Pole, and is said in spite of the struggle between Rome and to have completely furnished the palace the English episcopate it had its cardi- for him; and Queen Elizabeth, who frenals, and because they were learned men quently visited Archbishop Parker, whom in times when few were so, they often she warmly liked in spite of his having a held state and judicial offices, and there wife, a married prelate being the gravest were eleven Lord Chancellors among them incongruity in her eyes. There is a funduring the fourteenth and fifteenth cen- ny account of her behavior when parting turies. Of course the prestige of the from them after one of these visits. She great influence this gave them with both had been entertained with much devotion church and state still attaches to the and luxury, and could not help feeling primacy. In 1501, Catherine of Ara- grateful even to Mrs. Parker. · Madam gon rested here with her ladies on her I may not call you," said the maiden first coming to England; and here, on the queen, “and mistress I must not call you; yet, though I know not what to call you, chapel. Portions of the palace show I do thank you."

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great antiquity, though it is not known Another queen came to the palace, not whether any of it is of the actual Saxon as a guest, but as a fugitive. On the 9th fabric of the Countess Goda, or whether of December, 1688, James II.'s unfortunate her palace was identical with that reportwife, the beautiful Mary of Modena, in the ed to have been repaired by Archbishops disguise of an Italian washer-woman, came Langton and Hubert Walter. Certainly flying from Whitehall, through dreadful it fell into decay until the advent (1216) of wind and rain, in a little open boat, across Archbishop Boniface. the Thames to the foot of the Water Tower, This Boniface must have been a very with her six-months old child, the future choleric and doughty fellow.

While on "Pretender," in her arms, rolled up as a a visit to the priory of St. Bartholomew, bundle of linen. The coach in which she in Smithfield, he entered into a spontaneexpected to go on to Gravesend was not ous and deadly wra

vrangle with its prior there, and she hid in the angle of the tow- and canons over some simple matter, and er till it came and she could make her when the indignant canons unclerically escape.

but manfully fell upon him tooth and Queen Victoria visited the palace dur- nail, he, after much and telling usage of ing the primacies of Archbishops How- his powerful fists and scathing tongue, ley, Sumner, and Longley, and the late fled away to Lambeth. There he got the archbishop, Dr. Archibald Campbell Tait, king's ear against the canons, and actually received the Prince of Wales at Lambeth. excommunicated them. Pope Urban IV.

In sailing down the Thames the oldest viewed the matter, however, in another portions of the palace are first to meet the light, and bade Boniface, in expiation of eye—the tower of the parish church, close his outrageous conduct, restore and into those of the fine Gate-house, the roof crease the Lambeth Palace. and west façade of the Great Hall (Jux- Some authorities think Boniface's preon's), Lollards' Tower, the lesser tower, decessor did the actual work upon borand the graceful lancet windows of the rowed sums, while Boniface boasted that

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