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Whereas, It is alleged to be the further purpose of said traction companies to refuse the operation of through trolley lines for a five cent fare over the bridges unless said traction companies are given the exclusive right to operate the short local lines over said bridges, which are highly profitable and which are operated over bridges, rails and terminals built and paid for by the city;

Now, Therefore, be it Resolved, That the Transit Commission be required to report in full on said situation to this body within ten days from date and to state specifically the franchise terminals of the companies operating said surface railroads. If the franchise terminals are not the Brooklyn side of the Williamsburgh bridge, for what reason the said Transit Commission permits said companies to stop at the bridge, instead of compelling them to proceed to their said franchise terminals ?

Why an adjustment of said differences looking toward compulsory operation by said railroads has not been taken up by the Transit Commission, in connection with the negotiations now pending for the modification of the Fourteenth Street tube and other contracts ?

Whether or not there is in said commission or any existing body power to compel operation over said bridge on said cars by said companies ?

If not, what legislation, if any, said commission has been advised by its counsel would be effective to compel said operation?

Any and all further facts or information bearing upon said subject.

Said resolution giving rise to debate, ordered that the same be laid upon the table. By Mr. Male:

Whereas, It is apparent from constantly recurring comment in the daily press, from the frequent criticism publicly uttered, a popular sentiment seems to be prevalent, that the State Boxing Law is not operating to the satisfaction of the public, that the boxing commission, license committee, judges, referees, club officials and others, whose activities are prescribed by the Boxing Law, have permitted or connived at unfair decisions, unconscionable purses, exhorbitant admission fees and other conditions which have operated to bring boxing into disrepute;

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a joint legislative committee of five members, to consist of two members of the Senate, to be appointed by the Temporary President of the Senate, and three members of the Assembly, to be appointed by the Speaker of the Assembly, be and hereby is created to investigate the activities of the State Boxing Commission, the license committee, judges, referees, club officials and all other persons and institutions connected with boxing, including participants, to consider the law of the State in relation to boxing, and to recommend such changes in the law or in the policy of the state regarding boxing as may be deemed necessary or appropriate.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That such committee organize forthwith by choosing from its members a chairman; that such committee have power to employ a secretary, counsel, stenog. raphers, assistants and such other employees and assistants as may be necessary; that such committee may sit within and without the city of Albany and have power to subpoena and compel the attendance of witnesses, including the production of any book, paper, record or document pertaining to the subject of its investigation, and have and possess, generally, all of the powers of a legislative committee, under the provisions of the Legislative Law; that such committee report to the Legislature as speedily as possible the result of its findings.

Further Resolved (if the Senate concur), That 'the expenses of such committee in carrying out the provisions of this resolution, not exceeding the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000), be payable out of the legislative contingent fund upon vouchers approved as provided by law. which was referred to the committee on ways and means. By Mr. Palma:

Whereas, The pending immigration bill sponsored by the Hon. Albert Johnson based upon two percent of the census of 1890 is un-American and discriminatory in that it was meant to practically bar all immigration from eastern and southern Europe and is intended as a challenge to the American people by the insolent attitude of a few.

Whereas, There is a distinct animosity shown in the bill towards the people who have contributed so much to the industrial and commercial life of our country and who by their manual labor have helped to achieve some of the most wonderful engineering features of the present century, such as the great subways of New York city, railways and the great Panama Canal. Let us remember, also, that about five hundred thousand of these same people, whom this bill intends to bar, fought gallantly under the Stars and Stripes for the dignity and honor of our country during the World's War, and as a race, these same people have contributed much to our present civilization.

Be it Resolved (if the Senate concur), That if restriction of immigration must come, we want it to come without partiality, without prejudice, without discrimination of nationality, race or creed; and,

Be it Resolved (if the concur concur), That the Congress of the United States be and the same is hereby respectfully memorialized, that we as the people of the State of New York, believers in the great fundamental principles upon which this nation was founded upon, vigorously object to the passage of such a bill; and,

Be it Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Clerk of the United States Senate and the Clerk of the House of Representatives,and to each Senator and Representative in Congress from this State.

Said resolution giving rise to debate, ordered that the same be laid upon the table. By Mr. Cuvillier:

Whereas, After a thorough hearing by the Hon. Thomas T. C. Crain, justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, sitting as a magistrate in the hearing of the criminal libel on the complaint of Richard E. Enright, Police Commissioner of the city of New York, against Louis A. Cuvillier and Magistrate Joseph E. Corrigan, in which hundreds of witnesses testified and thousands of pages of testimony were taken as to the corruption, perjury, bribery and collusion of the police department of the city of New York with bootleggers and the sale of illicit poisonous liquor to the citizens of the city of New York, Judge Crain in a lengthy opinion among other things stated :

“It is deducible from the testimony that the force as a whole has been inefficient in connection with the enforcement of the Mullan-Gage Law; that some in it were themselves violators of that law, and that the existence of the law was made by a considerable number of the force the occasion for theft and extortion."

And further stated that “the inspector should cease to be the banker for the bootlegger, the captain his protector and the patrolman his solicitor and it must have come to the knowledge of Commissioner Enright that this deplorable condition existed in the enforcement of the Mullan-Gage State Prohibition Law.'

And he stated further that the Commissioner must continue to bestir himself to drive unworthy men from the force, that the members of the police department have no hesitancy to commit perjury and connive in crime even defying the courts of justice itself.

And, Whereas, Through the inefficient administration of the police department of the city of New York by Commissioner Enright the crimes of murder, robbing, burglary and hold-ups of the citizen of the city of New York has been unparalleled in the annals of the city;

Whereas, The lives and property of the citizens of the city of New York have been imperilled through the inefficiency of the police department to the extent that life and property are no longer safe in public or private places ;

Whereas, Notwithstanding the warning given by Judge Crain to the police department of the city of New York to see that the law was enforced to the letter, the police department has continued and is continuing to permit bootlegging in the city of New York under their protection in which poisonous liquors are sold to the citizens of the city of New York which has imperilled the health and life of the citizens, and Commissioner Enright in place of correcting the condition as disclosed in the Crain investigation immediately took a vacation of three weeks to the Island of Bermuda and permitted the police department of 14,000 men to run itself without any official discipline;

Whereas, Ninety per cent of the police force of the city of New York want to do their full duty, nevertheless instead of being a well and efficiently disciplined army of peace officers, under a proper police commissioner, it has become a disorganized mob applying their official authority for the purpose of graft and corruption and allowing crime to go undetected;

Therefore, be it Resolved (if the Senate concur), That it is the solemn duty of the Legislature of the State of New York to at once thoroughly investigate the lack of police administration in the city of New York from the police commissioner down and to effect such remedies in the police department that life, health and property of the citizens of the city of New York will be safe from the murderer, burglar, highway robber and bootlegger and if there is sufficient and adequate force in the police department of the city of New York to properly protect the citizens of the city of New York.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a joint legislative committee, to consist of four members of the Senate, to be appointed by the Temporary President of the Senate, and five members of the Assembly, to be appointed by the Speaker of the Assembly, be and hereby is created to investigate the police department of the city of New York in all respects as outlined in this resolution and to report to the Legislature not later than April 1, 1924, the result of its findings.

Resolved, That such committee organize by choosing from amongst its members a chairman, may employ a secretary, counsel, stenographer, and such other employees and assistants as may be necessary and fix their compensation; that such committee may sit within and without the city of Albany, shall have power to subpoena and compel the attendance of witnesses, including the production of any book, paper, record or document pertaining to the subject of its investigation, and shall have and exercise generally all of the powers of a legislative committee as provided by law.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the expenses of such committee, not exceeding the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), be payable out of the legislative contingent fund in the manner provided by law. which was referred to the committee on ways and means. By Mr. Ruger:

Whereas, There is pending in Congress of the United States legislation to increase the compensation paid to employees in the postal service of the United States, providing a maximum salary of $2,400 per year and 80 cents per hour for substitutes for all work performed;

Whereas, It is the sense of the Legislature that the faithfulness of the skilled and highly trained employees of the postal service should be rewarded by the payment to them of a living wage.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the Legislature of the State of New York hereby memorialize Congress of the United States to enact such legislation as will fix a maximum salary of employees of the postal service at $2,400 per year and 80 cents per hour for substitutes for all work performed; and,

Be it further Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Clerk of the United States Senate, and to the Clerk of the House of Representatives, and to each Senator and Representative in Congress from this State.

Said resolution giving rise to debate, ordered that the same be laid upon the table. By Mr. Murphy:

Whereas, The report of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States to the Congress indicates that the estimated revenues for the government for the next fiscal year will greatly exceed the estimated expenses; and,

Whereas, The Secretary of the Treasury, with the approval of the President of the United States, has submitted to the Congress a plan for the revision of the Federal Income Tax Law, so as to accomplish a material reduction in the taxes from that source ; and,

Whereas, Such plan was prepared, after careful study by experts, and, as stated by the Secretary of the Treasury, for the purpose of benefiting the greatest number, and especially taxpayers of small income, and so adjusted that the source of revenue to the government from taxpayers of larger income will not be materially decreased, while at the same time encouraging the investment of capital in industry rather than in tax exempt securities; and,

Whereas, The people of the State of New York, who pay approximately one-sixth of the total income taxes of the government are vitally interested in such measure.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the Legislature of the State of New York hereby expresses its approval of the essential features of such plan and urges the members of Congress and Senators from this State to use every reasonable effort to secure their enactment into law, in substantial compliance with the recommendations of the Secretary of the Treasury.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a copy of this resolution be transmitted by the Clerks of the Senate and Assembly to the Clerks of the House of Representatives and Senate of the United States, and that a copy be also transmitted by them to each Senator and member of the House of Representatives from this State.

Said resolution giving rise to debate, ordered that the same be laid upon the table. By Mr. Boyle:

Whereas, There has been for some time past an organized movement on the part of the citizens of the State of New York to

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