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Also, “An act to amend the Real Property Law, in relation to deposits for security under leases” (Int. No. 254), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Beck introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Conservation Law, in relation to the posting of private parks and private lands” (Int. No. 255), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on conservation.

Mr. Ricca introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Election Law, in relation to designating petitions and independent petitions” (Int. No. 256), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Rosenman introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Civil Practice Act with reference to certain allegations and proof in an action to recover the possession of real property” (Int. No. 257), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on codes.

Also, An act to amend the Civil Practice Act with reference to summary proceedings where the landlord seeks in good faith to recover possession of the premises for the immediate and personal occupancy by himself and his family as a dwelling" (Int. No. 258), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on codes.

Also, “An act to amend the Civil Practice Act with reference to summary proceedings to recover real property for the personal use and occupation of the landlord” (Int. No. 259), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on codes.

Also, “An act to amend chapter one hundred thirty-six of the Laws of nineteen hundred and twenty with relation to necessary allegations and proof in an action for rent of premises occupied for dwelling purposes” (Int. No. 260), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on codes.

Mr. Ruger introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Election Law, in relation to terms and elections of members of county committees” (Int. No. 261), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Samberg introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Tenement House Law, in relation to repapering and repainting apartments” (Int. No. 262), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on affairs of cities.

Also, “An act to amend the Election Law, in relation to publication of concurrent resolutions and proposed constitutional amendments and propositions” (Int. No. 263), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Shields introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Tax Law, in relation to abolishing the State Board of Equalization, and vesting its powers and duties in the Tax Commission” (Int. No. 264), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on taxation and retrenchment.

Also, “Concurrent resolution of the Senate and Assembly proposing an amendment to section four of article seven and section ten of article eight of the Constitution, in relation to tax exempt State and municipal securities” (Int. No. 265), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Mr. Steinberg introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Education Law, in relation to the appointment of district superintendents and other employees” (Int. No. 266), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on public education.

Mr. Van Wagenen introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the County Law, in relation to public health nurses” (Int. No. 267), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on public health.

Also, "An act to provide for completing the tax title of Marie Ferro to one hundred and nine acres of lands, now or formerly, occupied by Max Ferro, in the town of Hurley. Ulster county, in Hurley patentee woods, first allotment, Great Lot nine, sold by the Comptroller to Marie Ferro at a tax sale in 'the month of December, nineteen hundred and twenty" (Int. No. 268), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on ways and means.

Mr. Weinfeld introduced a bill entitled “An act to amend the Public Buildings Law, in relation to the control and supervision by the Adjutant-General of the New York State Soldiers and Sailors' Home” (Int. No. 269), which was read the first time and referred to a committee on military affairs.

Also, “An act to amend the Real Property Law, in relation to notice by landlord 'to tenent requiring him to remove from the premises” (Int. No. 270), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on the judiciary.

Also, "An act to amend the Penal Law, by authorizing the pursuit of their businesses and occupations by certain persons on the first day of the week” (Int. No. 271), which was read the first time and referred to the committee on codes.

The following resolutions introduced January 14th, and laid upon the table under the rule, were read: By Mr. Cuvillier:

Whereas, The Governor in his annual message to the Legislature speaking on the subject of “Agriculture,” said “The present organization of the Council of Farms and Markets, however, is so fundamentally wrong that a chief executive cannot deal with it. I have not pleasure of the acquaintance of the Council of Farms and Markets, and I have met the Commissioner of Agriculture, who is their appointee about twice. I feel no responsibility for the official acts of these men. I presume they will report to your honorable bodies. Whether they do or not, however, the responsibility is yours, as the Council of Farms and Markets is selected by the Legislature, although such procedure is directly contrary to the theory of our government. The selection of public officials with administratve functions is not a legislative, but, on the contrary, is an executive function. The only exception is the Department of Education, where we are all in accord with the pending

constitutional amendment under which this department head remains under a regency.

“Actuated by a clearly indicated necessity for a change of policy that will fix responsibility, I have three times recommended that the Department of Agriculture be placed under the Executive, in order that he may be held accountable for its operation, as was intended by the framers of our govermental structure. Strange as it is to say, each time the proposal has been defeated by the representatives of the sections of the State who would be particularly benefited by a more progressive and more enlightened administration of that particular department of government.

“At the last session of the Legislature $5,000,000 was appropriated for indemnities to farms for tubercular cattle slaughtered. The previous administration had made no appropriation to carry on this work after January 1, 1922; therefore, a part of the appropriation was to meet past obligations, and the remainder for the work of the current fiscal year. I must presume that your Hon. orable Bodies in fixing $2,200,000 as the amount to be spent in the fiscal year 1923–1924, did so after advice from the Council of Farms and Markets. If that be true the Council has entirely disregarded any arrangements you have made concerning the progress of this work by disposing of a twelve months' appropriation in approximately four months."

Whereas, It has been reported that a chief executive officer of the department of Farms and Markets has himself received several thousand dollars out of the appropriation for slaughtered cattle ;

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the Attorney-General be directed to investigate the actions of the Council of Farms and Markets in respect of its expenditure of moneys appropriated to pay for slaughtered diseased cattle to ascertain if there has been any violation of law in such expenditure of money and to report to the legislature as speedily as possible, and if he deems advisable, to institute prosecution.

Whereas, New York State, is rapidly losing supremacy as an agricultural state, due to the fact that tho sands of farmers are selling their farms or abandoning them and moving into other states, which procedure it is stated has been brought about largely on account of lack of cooperation on the part of the agricultural administration system of the State government;

Whereas, The people of our cities are being fed almost exclusively on many products brought from other States, and the present system of administering the department of farms and markets seems to be first to create jobs and draw salaries with the interests of the farmers a secondary consideration ;

Be it Resolved (if the Senate concur), That a joint legislative committee is hereby created to consist of three members of the Senate, to be appointed by the Temporary President of the Senate, and four members of the Assembly, to be appointed by the Speaker of the Assembly. to investigate the conduct of business by the Department of Farms and Markets, and to inquire into general

agricultural conditions in the State, with a view of recommending to the Legislature, as speedily as possible, such changes in personnel of administration and changes in the Farms and Markets Law as will remedy present conditions.

Resolved, That such committee organize by choosing from its members a chairman; that such committee may employ a secretary, counsel and such other employees and assistants as may be necessary and fix their compensation; that such committee may sit within and without the city of Albany, may subpoena and compel the attendance of witnesses, including the production of any book, paper, record or document pertaining to the subject of its investigation and generally have and exercise all of the powers of a legislative committee.

Resolved (if the Senate concur), That the expenses of such committee, not exceeding the sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000), be payable out of the legislative contingent fund in the manner provided by law. which was referred to the committee on ways and means. By Mr. Cuvillier:

Whereas, The people of this State, as expressed in their utter contempt for the Volstead Law of the United States and the jurors in the several counties of the State failing to convict for violations of the United States Laws which is deplorable, as stated by eminent judges in the State of New York; and

Whereas, The grand jurors in the counties of New York, Kings and the Bronx made a presentment to the court that the MullanGage Law had created a condition of lawlessness in said counties, has made the citizens disrespect the law and has made criminals out of many reputable citizens and earnestly prays for the respect of all laws by the citizens of the State and the legislature repealed the Mullan-Gage acts:

Whereas, The Supreme Court of the United States has held that a citizen can be twice placed in jeopardy for the same offence for violation of the Federal and State prohibition laws and it is the sense of the Legislature of the State of New York that prohibition has caused an open violation of the law, and the results of the Volstead Evil Law, are eighteen effects to the Eighteenth Amendment, which are as follows:

First: It has deprived the people of the United States of their inherent right of liberty.

Second: It has made a nation of hypocrites.
Third : It has made lawbreaking popular.

Fourth: It has created a state of rebellion among millions of our citizens.

Fifth: It has destroyed the sacredness of law.
Sixth: It has resulted in the moral degeneration of our people.
Seventh: It has made a whiskey-drinking nation.
Eighth: It has brought corruption in public office.

[ASSEMBLY JOURNAL] 9

Ninth: It has created a multitude of new officers to harass the people.

Tenth: It has established a spy system in our country.
Eleventh: It has debauched our youth.
Twelfth: It has made bootlegging a respectable business.

Thirteenth: It has given special privileges to the rich, who can afford to buy liquors and to entertain their prohibition friends.

Fourteenth: It has taken away the harmless glass of beer from the workingman and the light wine from those long accustomed to it.

Fifteenth: It has subjected legitimate business to the whims, caprices and arrogance of government officials.

Sixteenth: It has increased taxation.

Seventeenth: It has brought in its trail all manner of petty grafting

Eighteenth: It has brought destruction to human life in its wake.

Resolved, It is the sense of the Legislature that a copy of this resolution be sent to each member of Congress from the State of New York.

Said resolution giving rise to debate, ordered that the same be laid upon the table. By Mr. Flynn:

Whereas, Since 1904, the following surface railroad lines have been operated over the Williamsburgh bridge between Brooklyn and Manhattan, Broadway, Ralph and Rockaway, Reid avenue, Sumner avenue, Tompkins avenue, Nostrand avenue, Franklin avenue, Wilson avenue, Bushwick avenue, and Grand street; and,

Whereas, On December 1, 1923, without good and sufficient reason, the operation of said car lines across said bridge was discontinued and between 85,000 and 100,000 men, women and children passengers are daily compelled to change cars on the Brooklyn side and pay an additional fare; and,

Whereas, Said change has not only exacted an extra fare but has caused great damage in inconvenience and loss of time to said passengers and has compelled them to wait by the thousands on the open Plaza in all kinds of weather; and,

Whereas, Notwithstanding the complaints of thousands of citizens, no apparent effort to relieve this condition, which affects the residents of the major portion of the Borough of Brooklyn and a large part of the Borough of Queens, has been made by the elected officials or by the members of the Transit Commission, a body created pursuant to an act of this Legislature; and,

Whereas. It is rumored that said traction companies are making a test case by failing to operate their lines over the Williamsburgh bridge, and, if successful, will discontinue the operation of their trolley service for a five cent fare over the Brooklyn and other bridges unless they are allowed over the bridges without the payment of license or temporary franchise fees; and,

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