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done ;

won,

Came struggling up ere all was And IIolloway, with best intent,

Still shiv'ring timber as he went ; In dingle deep poor Fungus fell, And Williams, clinging to the pack, A plant that loves the water well; As if the league were at his back ; For minutes ten or thereabout And Tollitt, ready still to sell He bathed, and then he foundered The nag that carried him so well. out;

When younger men of lighter By application of spur-rowel,

weight Charles rubbed him dry without a Some tale of future sport relate, towel.

Let Whippy show the brush he As on the pack by Kelmscote flew, What meant thoso coats of scarlet And tell them of the Tar Wood run; hue ?

While Rival's portrait on the wall, Who were those by the neighbour- Shall oft to memory recall ing wood,

The gallant fox, the burning scent, Who heedless of the scouring stood? The rasping leaps, the pace they The Valley of the White Horse pack,

went ; While idle steeds their riders back, How Whimsey led the pack at first, Impatient range the covert round, When reynard from the woodside Their morning fox as yet unfound;

burst ; That huntsman's horn and echoing How Pamela, how puppy hound, cheer

First seized him struggling on the Was music to the strangers' ear, ground; And they who felt the pace too How Prudence shun’d the taint of hot

hare, Sought gladly there a resting spot. Taught young in life to have a Thus fleets, when they no more can

care ;'' bide

How as the pack by Lechlade flew, The fury of the wind and tide, Where close and thick the fences If chance some tranquil port they grew, spy

Three bitches led the tuneful Where vessels safe at anchor lie,

throng, There seek a shelter from the gale, All worthy of a place in song ; With helm reversed and slackened Old Fairplay, ne'er at skirting sail.

caught, Thus patriots faint of heart, who And Pensive, speeding quick as deem

thought, Some honest measure too extreme, While Handsome prov'd the adage No longer to their colours true,

true, Take refuge in the “juste milieu.” That “ Handsome are that handThe speed of horse, the pluck of

Then long may courteous Redesdale They needed both who led the van. live, This Holmes can tell, who thro' the And oft his pack such gallops give! day

Should fox again so stoutly run, Was ever foremost in the fray ; May I be there to see the fun,

some do."

men,

(To be continued.)

[blocks in formation]

Christchurch Meadows by Moonlight—The Lovers surprised-Bonny Barbara in

Florence-Flickering Lights and Shadows of the Past - The Present and the Future.

The dome of heaven was radiant with the starry sphere—the grey clouds travelled quickly past the silvery moon—while o'er the landscape and the rippling Isis gleamed a streaked light of vivid mystic blue, and ever and anon it tinged the outline of the rising ground, or spread its cheerful brightness o'er the silent glade ; and, save where a flickering light denoted the collegian's latticed chamber, the classic meadows of Christ Church breathed a fragrant stillness and a soft repose. It was autumn time and evening tide. The vesper

bell had

rung

its parting note ; the domini were mostly caged in comfortable quarters, discussing the merits of old port ; and the merry student had closed his oak, to consecrate the night to friendship, sack, and claret. The studious book-worm pondered over his tomes ; and the black-lettered magii of the schools met in conclave, to decipher the arrow-pointed hieroglyphics of Egyptian lore.

Along the banks where Isis winds its way, o'ershadowed by umbrageous foliage of varied hue, there came a youthful pair upon the sight, and, as they passed and pressed the velvet pasture, their light step and silvery tongues denoted they were lovers, seeking the solitude of sweet, refreshing nature and of eve, to hold communion of kindred thought, to pledge their mutual vows of love, and breathe the inspiration of the soul.

It was not the first time that Fitzgeorge and Mary Jessop had been seen wandering by Isis's classic stream, courting the stillness of the silvery mead. Their open, undisguised, and accredited attachment left no room for prying curiosity, suspicious reports, or idle misrepresentation. Old Frank Jessop had given his consent to the attachment, and meant to promote the union as soon as he could; but, as yet, he had not communicated his intention, or that of the lovers, to Wilton Burney; and, although the lovely Mary bore Jessop's name, and had always been considered his daughter, old Frank felt convinced that Wilton Burney had an equal, if not a stronger, claim to be consulted in the disposal of her hand.

* Dear Mary,” said Fitzgeorge, “you acted nobly in rejecting the tempting present. Be assured that the jeweller would find the right owner.

done ;

won,

run;

Came struggling up ere all was And IIolloway, with best intent,

Still shiv’ring timber as he went ; In dingle deep poor Fungus fell, And Williams, clinging to the pack, A plant that loves the water well; As if the league were at his back ; For minutes ten or thereabout And Tollitt, ready still to sell He bathed, and then he floundered The nag that carried him so well. out;

When younger men of lighter By application of spur-rowel,

weight Charles rubbed him dry without a Some tale of future sport relate, towel.

Let Whippy show the brush he As on the pack by Kelmscote flew, What meant those coats of scarlet And tell them of the Tar Wood huo?

While Rival's portrait on the wall, Who were those by the neighbour- Shall oft to memory recall ing wood,

The gallant fox, the burning scent, Who heedless of the scouring stood? The rasping leaps, the pace they The Valley of the White Horse pack,

went ; While idle steeds their riders back, How Whimsey led the pack at first, Impatient range the covert round, When reynard from the woodside Their morning fox as yet unfound;

burst; That huntsman's horn and echoing How Pamela, how puppy hound, cheer

First seized him struggling on the Was music to the strangers' ear, ground; And they who felt the pace too How Prudence shun’d the taint of hot

hare, Sought gladly there a resting spot. Taught young in life to have a Thus fleets, when they no more can

care ;'' bide

How as the pack by Lechlade flew, The fury of the wind and tide, Where close and thick the fences If chance some tranquil port they grew, spy

Three bitches led the tuneful Where vessels safe at anchor lie,

throng, There seek a shelter from the gale, All worthy of a place in song ; With helm reversed and slackened Old Fairplay, ne'er at skirting sail.

caught, Thus patriots faint of heart, who And Pensive, speeding quick as deem

thought, Some honest measure too extreme, While Handsome prov'd the adage No longer to their colours true,

true, Take refuge in the “juste milieu.” That “ Handsome are that handThe speed of horse, the pluck of

some do."

Then long may courteous Redesdale They needed both who led the van. live, This Holmes can tell, who thro' the And oft his pack such gallops give! day

Should fox again so stoutly run, Was ever foremost in the fray ; May I be there to see the fun,

man,

(To be continued.)

[blocks in formation]

rung

Christchurch Meadows by Moonlight—The Lovers surprised-Bonny Barbara in

Florence-Flickering Lights and Shadows of the Past - The Present and the Future.

The dome of heaven was radiant with the starry sphere—the grey clouds travelled quickly past the silvery moon—while o'er the landscape and the rippling Isis gleamed a streaked light of vivid mystic blue, and ever and anon it tinged the outline of the rising ground, or spread its cheerful brightness o'er the silent glade ; and, save where a flickering light denoted the collegian's latticed chamber, the classic meadows of Christ Church breathed a fragrant stillness and a soft repose. It was autumn time and evening tide.

The
vesper

bell had its parting note ; the domini were mostly caged in comfortable quarters, discussing the merits of old port ; and the merry student had closed his oak, to consecrate the night to friendship, sack, and claret. The studious book-worm pondered over his tomes ; and the black-lettered magii of the schools met in conclave, to decipher the arrow-pointed hieroglyphics of Egyptian lore.

Along the banks where Isis winds its way, o'ershadowed by umbrageous foliage of varied hue, there came a youthful pair upon the sight, and, as they passed and pressed the velvet pasture, their light step and silvery tongues denoted they were lovers, seeking the solitude of sweet, refreshing nature and of eve, to hold communion of kindred thought, to pledge their mutual vows of love, and breathe the inspiration of the soul.

It was not the first time that Fitzgeorge and Mary Jessop had been seen wandering by Isis’s classic stream, courting the stillness of the silvery mead. Their open, undisguised, and accredited attachment left no room for prying curiosity, suspicious reports, or idle misrepresentation. Old Frank Jessop had given his consent to the attachment, and meant to promote the union as soon as he could; but, as yet, he had not communicated his intention, or that of the lovers, to Wilton Burney; and, although the lovely Mary bore Jessop's name, and had always been considered his daughter, old Frank felt convinced that Wilton Burney had an equal, if not a stronger, claim to be consulted in the disposal of her hand.

* Dear Mary,” said Fitzgeorge, “you acted nobly in rejecting the tempting present. Be assured that the jeweller would find the right owner.'

“ It matters little if he does or not, dear Julius. Such a gift from a stranger, who concealed his name, could only be considered an insult.”

“And if he had avowed himself,” inquired Fitzgeorge, with some alarm, “would that, Mary, have rendered the present more acceptable, or have lessened the indignity ?”

“No-on the contrary ; for if, as I suspect, it came from the royal libertine, I think the insult more offensive.”

“You are a deal girl, and worthy of all my devotion. But tell me, Mary, what said old Frank to your illustrious conquest.'

“ He said what his good, kind, affectionate old heart prompted him to say, but what it would not be proper for me to repeat—at least, in his language_lest I might be guilty of treason.”

“ Let it pass, Mary. The time may come when I shall be justified in resenting this offence, and proving my gratitude to your dear old guardian, who has been a father to you and a kind friend to me.”

“ To everybody, Julius; to everybody. Frank Jessop, under a rough coating, has a warm, indulgent, and generous heart ; he is one of the best men that ever brenthed ; and if he is not my father by law, I am sure that I am his daughter by love. It distresses me, Julius, and I am sure that it distresses both him and you, to entertain doubts which we have no means of elucidating. Ever since the visit of that mysterious old Crone of Thorpe Glen, I have noticed an unusual dejection in my father's spirits, and a visible alteration in his manner towards both of us ; not that he is less affectionate and kind in conduct and in speech; but occasionally he is more abstracted and reserved, and talks to himself. Yesterday I overheard him say—- It cannot be ; the old hag must have invented the tale to impose upon us both ; and yet-' Here he paused for some time, and then, heaving a deep sigh, he said — It were better it should

I'll hie me to the wold, and know the worst.' And this morning he set off for Lincolnshire.

“ It is strange—very strange. We are the children of mystery, Mary : we live in the world, and among the world, and yet I sometimes doubt if we are of it. That you are an angel, I am sure, said Fitzgeorge, playfully ; "and that I am some mythological hero in disguise, I feel quite certain. How we either of us became wanderers on this earth is enveloped in deep mystery ; but fate, my dear Mary, which brought us together, evidently intended us for companions ; and some day or other the gods, who alone seem to know our true history, will draw the veil aside, and show us who and what we really are."

“ But if the discovery should produce any transformation of what we are !” said Mary, somewhat apprehensively. “ It might be more agrecable to remain in our present doubtful but happy state.'

“ I have often thought of that,” replied Fitzgeorge : “it might be the source of great misery to one or both of us. If, for instance, Mary, you should prove to be some rich man's heiress, and I should continue to be the poor student I am

Stop there, Julius : I will not allow you to conjure up such an impossibility, nor will I permit you to hazard the unjust conclusion I think you were arriving at. No, Julius ; if I were a rich mạn's heiress, I would enrich the man I loved before I married him, that I might insure his confidence and secure his regard."

be so.

n"

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