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Oh, feet of a fawn to the greenwood fled,

Alone in the grass and the loveliness;
Leap of the hunted, no more in dread,

Beyond the snares and the deadly press :
Yet a voice still in the distance sounds,
A voice and a fear and a haste of hounds;
O wildly labouring, fiercely fleet,

Onward yet by river and glen ....
Is it joy or terror, ye storm-swift feet? ....

To the dear lone lands untroubled of men,
Where no voice sounds, and amid the shadowy green
The little things of the woodland live unseen.
What else is Wisdom? What of man's endeavour

Or God's high grace, so lovely and so great?
To stand from fear set free, to breathe and wait;

To hold a hand uplifted over Hate;
And shall not Loveliness be loved for ever?

What joyous abandon, what delight in external nature, what romantic freedom are in those verses! Yes, they are truly modern, and by a modern poet, Gilbert Murray; but they are also a translation from another modern poet, the great Euripides.

Do the Greeks seem far away? Not to those who possess the historic sense. And here let me cite some appropriate words, which John G. Neihardt has written in a note prefacing The Song of Three Friends:

As a result of our individualistic tendencies, our numerous jostling nationalities, and our materialistic temper, we Americans are prone to regard the Past as being separated from us as by an insurmountable wall. We lack the sense of racial continuity. For us it is almost as though the world began yesterday morning; and too much of our contemporary literature is based upon that view. The affairs of antiquity seem to the generality of us to be as remote as the dimmest star, and as little related to our activities. But what we call the slow lapse of ages is really only the blinking of an eye. Sometimes this sense of the close unity of all time and all human experience has come upon me so strongly that I have felt, for an intense moment, how just a little hurry on my part might get me there in time to hear Aeschylus training a Chorus, or to see the wizard chisel still busy with the Parthenon frieze, or to hear Socrates telling his dreams to his judges. It is in some such mood that I approach that body of precious saga-stuff which I have called the Western American Epos; and I see it, not as a thing in itself, but rather as one phase of the whole race life from the beginning; indeed, the final link in that long chain of heroic periods stretching from the region of the Euphrates eastward into India and westward to our own Pacific Coast.

Some day—and the day may not be far distant—the great American epic will be written. The author will be a poet to whom, as to Neihardt, antiquity will seem very near. He will be a modern Virgil, filled with the greatness and glory of his theme—the achievements of his people. He will be familiar not merely with the chronicles of a few score years that men have lived on American soil, but also with the story of the motherland and with all the sagas of the Aryan race. His song will also deal with the glory and honor that other nations have brought into the land. But the poet will also be a seer, peering into the future, and in his matchless verse, full of echoes of all the great epics from Homer on, he will sing of the golden age to be, when wars shall be no more, and America, true to her lofty ideals, shall take her rightful place in the council of the nations,

"In the Parliament of man, the Federation of the World.”

Aeschylus, 19, 20, 22, 25, 37, 40, 42, 44, 49 Eliot, T. S., 12, 13
Aiken, Conrad, 12

Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 9
Alcaeus, 44

Empedocles, 26, 40
Aldington, Richard, 9 n., 29

Euripides, 20, 21, 22, 25, 32-36, 40, 41, 49
Aldington, Mrs. Richard, (see Hilda Doo-
little, and H. D.)

Ficke, Arthur Davison, 12
Allinson, Francis G., 33

Fiske, John, 39
Anaxagoras, 25

Fletcher, John Gould, 12, 29
Antipater of Sidon, 15

Flint, F. S., 29, 36
Apollodorus, 18

Frost, Robert, 12, 13, 14, 43
Apuleius, 29

Furness, Horace Howard, 46
Aratus, 11

Gildersleeve, Basil L., 8
Argentarius, Marcus, 15

Glaucus, 15
Arion, 31

Goethe, 10, 13, 48
Aristophanes, 18, 21, 40

Gray, Agnes Kendrick, 14
Aristotle, 20, 22

Greek Anthology, 13, 15, 32, 33
Auslander, Joseph, 13

Greene, Robert, 22
Bacchylides, 31, 35

Guarantors' prize, 13
Bacon, Leonard, 12

Gypsy, 13
Bailey, John, 9, 10, 11

H. D., 12, 29, 31–36, 43
Beach, Joseph Warren, 43

Hall, Stanley, 39
Benét, Stephen Vincent, 12

Harris, Frank, 22
Benét, William Rose, 12

Hendrick, Burton J., 8
Boston Intelligence, 10
Branch, Anna Hempstead, 12

Hippocrates, 18

Homer, 9, 10, 29, 32, 34, 39, 40, 41, 43, 50
Brander, Georg, 22

Horace, 16, 26, 28, 47
Brewer, William A., Jr., 39 n.

Houghton, Lord, 10
Briggs, Le Baron Russell, 46 n.
Bryant, William Cullen, 27

Ibycus, 32
Burns, Robert, 20
Bynner, Witter, 12, 13

Jeffers, Robinson, 43, 45

Jonson, Ben, 12, 22
Carphyllides, 15

Juvenal, 20
Catullus, 28, 35, 40, 48
Cestre, Charles, 15

Keats, 43
Chapman, 43

King James Bible, 30
Chaucer, 30
Chicago Daily News, 13

Lee, Agnes, 13
Cicero, 18

Le Gallienne, Richard, 7
Claudian, 29

Leonard, William Ellery, 12, 40, 41, 42
Collins, H. P., 7, 35, 36, 43

Lindsay, Vachel, 12
Confucius, 13

Loeffler, Charles Martin, 9
Contemporary Verse, 13

Longfellow, 27
Cushing, Harvey, 8

Lowell, Amy, 12, 13, 14, 29, 36

Lowell, James Russell, 27
Day, Chancellor, 47

Lowes, John Livingston, 30 n.
Deutsch, Babette, 43

Lucian, 20
Doolittle, Hilda, 12, 29 (see H. D.) Lucilius, 15
Dowden, Edward, 10

Lucretius, 13, 20, 30, 40, 42, 48

Macedonius, 15

Robinson, David Moore, 32
Masters, Edgar Lee, 12, 14

Rorty, James, 43
McAlmon, Robert, 13

Rossetti, D. G., 10
Meleager, 33
Mendell, Clarence W., 40

St. Paul, 23
Millay, Edna St. Vincent, 12, 13, 28

Sandburg, Carl, 11, 12, 43
Molière, 48

San Francisco Chronicle, 39 n.
Monroe, Harriet, 11, 36, 40, 45

Santayana, George, 12
Moore, Marianne, 13

Sappho, 15, 27, 28, 32, 33, 35, 37, 44
Murray, Gilbert, 49

Sarett, Lew, 12

Scott, Bell, 10
Neihardt, John G., 37, 49

Sedgwick, Ellery, 48
New Republic, 43

Seiffert, Marjorie Allen, 36
New York Times, 43

Sévigné, Mme de, 47
New York Tribune, 43

Shakespeare, 11, 12, 20, 22, 30, 48
Nicarchus, 15

Showerman, Grant, 16
Nossis, 33

Simonides, 10
Noyes, Alfred, 48

Socrates, 18, 49
O'Neill, Eugene, 8

Sophocles, 19, 20, 27, 37, 40
Oppenheim, James, 12

Spoon River Anthology, 13
Osler, Sir William, 8

Stanley, Albert A., 8
Our Debt to Greece and Rome, 7

Stesichorus, 35
Ovid, 13

Swinburne, 10, 32

Symonds, John Addington, 10
Page, Walter Hines, 8
Palatine Anthology, 15

Tacitus, 20
Palo Alto Times, 38 n.

Teasdale, Sara, 12, 27
Parry, Sir Hubert, 8

Theocritus, 32, 36, 45
Pericles, 10, 21

Timotheus, 31
Pindar, 31, 35

Turbyfill, Mark, 13
Plato, Philosopher, 10, 12, 18, 20, 40

Tyrtaeus, 10
Plato, Poet, 15, 33

Untermeyer, Louis, 12, 14, 22, 28, 36, 38, 46
Plutarch, 19, 23
Poe, Edgar Allen, 14

Value of the Classics, 47
Poetry, 11, 13, 14, 36, 44

Van Doren, Mark, 14
Pope, 20, 46

van Dyke, Henry, 48
Posidippus, 15

Virgil, 7, 9, 17, 19, 29, 30, 34, 37, 38, 40,
Pound, Ezra, 12, 13, 29
Powell, York, 10

Weirick, Bruce, 11
Propertius, 13
Pulitzer prize, 13, 14, 28, 40

West, Andrew F., 47
Pupin, Michael, 8

Wheelock, John Hall, 12

Whicher, George Meason, 13
Quinn, Arthur Hobson, 8

Whitman, Walt, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 27, 38, 46
Quintilian, 35

Whittier, John Greenleaf, 27

Wilkie, J. R., 39
Ransom, John Crowe, 43

Wood, Charles Erskine Scott, 12, 48
Redman, Ben Ray, 14

Woodberry, George Edward, 12
Reese, Lizette Woodworth, 12

Wordsworth, 20
Robinson, Edwin Arlington, 12, 13, 14,
15, 16, 18, 21, 24, 25 n., 26, 27, 36, 47 Xenophon, 40, 41

48, 49

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