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UNIVERSITY SERIES

LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

VOLUME I

No. 1. THE MODERN ENGLISH VERB-ADVERB COMBINATION. Arthur

Garfield Kennedy, Instructor in English Philology. 51 pages. 1920.

Postpaid, paper, 75 cents; cloth, $1.25. No. 2. Much ADO ABOUT NOTHING, PARALLEL PASSAGE EDITION. Edited

by Alphonso Gerald Newcomer, Late Professor of English; completed by Henry David Gray, Professor of English. 275 pages. 1928. Postpaid, paper, $2.00; cloth, $2.75.

VOLUME II

No. 1. LIFE AND TIMES OF APOLLONIUS OF TYANA. Rendered into English

from the Greek of Philostratus the Elder, by Charles P. Eells.

264 pages. 1923. Postpaid, paper, $2.00; cloth, $2.75. No. 2. THE CLASSICS AND OUR TWENTIETH-CENTURY Poets, address as

President of the American Philological Association at Harvard University, December 29, 1926. Henry Rushton Fairclough, Professor of Classical Literature. 52 pages. 1927. Postpaid, paper, 50 cents; cloth, $1.00.

VOLUME III

No. 1. Cuentos POPULARES ESPAÑOLES. Tomo I. Aurelio M. Espinosa,

Professor of Romanic Languages. 168 pages. 1923. Postpaid, paper, $1.75; cloth, $2.50.

(Continued on third page of cover)

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STANFORD UNIVERSITY, CALIFORNIA

LONDON: HUMPHREY MILFORD
OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

THE MARUZEN-KABUSHIKI-KAISHA
TOKYO, OSAKA, KYOTO, FUKUOKA, SENDAI

THE BAKER & TAYLOR COMPANY
55 FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK

COPYRIGHT 1929 BY THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF THE LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIVERSITY

All Rights Reserved

Published 1929

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

BY STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

Libraries. 6-22-29

FOREWORD

It was Professor Newcomer's hope to edit all of the plays of Shakespeare on the plan of the present volume. His death in 1913 prevented his completion of even this first venture. He continued to work upon it, in spite of his failing health, until he reached line 174 of Act v, scene 1.1 It is not right that his valuable plan for presenting Shakespeare as his own interpreter should be forgotten, nor that his contribution to Shakespearean scholarship, upon which he spent so much loving care, should be lost. I have therefore completed Mr. Newcomer's task, supplying notes and parallels from v.1.175 to the end of the play. I have also included a few notes of my own (bracketed and initialed) where the controversy of the critics has given particular interest to the passage.

Professor Newcomer came late to the critical study of Shakespeare, but throughout his whole life he had an unusual appreciation of and familiarity with even the lesser plays. He was well equipped for his task. And when the fascination of investigation finally got hold of him, he confessed that he had the greatest difficulty in compelling himself to do anything else.

The thoroughness with which Mr. Newcomer did his work is evidenced by the fact that he has in his parallel passages and notes 2,617 references to Shakespeare's other plays and poems. And because he had nothing of the sort in mind, the numbers supplied by the various plays may be of interest to those who are curious about such matters. Of course a large proportion of the references are of no value whatever in indicating the kinship of Much Ado to Shakespeare's other dramas, but the remaining fraction will be fairly constant. It will be seen that the plays nearest in time supply the greater number of the references. The list is as follows:

LLL, 135; Err., 50; Gent., 84; Mids., 77; Merch., 86; Shrew, 88; Wiv., 91; As, 130; Twel., 99; Troil., 82; All's, 81; Meas., 59; Per., Cym., 73; Wint., 81; Temp., 56.

1H6, 27; 2H6, 39; 3H6, 30; R3, 53; R2, 43; John, 65; 1H4, 89; 2H4, 87; H5, 70; H8, 18.

Tit., 20; Rom., 129; Caes., 43; Hml., 107; Oth., 83; Lear, 87; Mcb., 65; Ant., 73; Tim., 26; Cor., 75.

Ven., 21; Lucr., 29; Sonn., 67; Compl., 5; Pilg., 2.

22;

1 Citations, throughout this edition, are according to the Cambridge Edition, edited by W. A. Neilson, Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, 1906. The abbreviations used for the titles of Shakespeare's plays are those (with modifications) of Schmidt's Lexicon. The Much Ado text is likewise that of the Cambridge Edition with alterations, explained in the accompanying notes, where preferred by Professor Newcomer.

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