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XOES.

ORGANIZATION.

GOVERNOR IRWIN. If the resolution had been put in that form, it Larue,

Porter,

Stuart, would have been proper, but it was not. The resolution is that the Con- Lewis,

Prouty,

Swing, vention proceed to vote.

Mansfield,
Pulliam,

Terry,
MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I call for the reading of the resolu- | Martin,

Reddy,

Tinnin, tion I have sent up to the desk, which is in reference to this very McCallum,

Reed,

Townsend, matter of proposing the names of candidates.

McConas,
Reynolds,

Tully,
Governor IRWIN. The gentleman is out of order.

McConnell,
Rhodes,

Turner, [Cries of " Call the roll."')

McFarland,
Rolfe,

Van Dyke,
MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I would like to have some gentle - MeNutt,

Schell,

Van Voorhies, man point out wherein I am out of order.

Miller,
Schomp,

Walker, of Tuoluinne, Governor IRWIN. The Convention has decided to proceed to vote Mills,

Shafter,

Waters, for a President of the Convention, and the gentleman will take his seat. Moreland,

Shoemaker,

Webster, MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I call for the reading of the reso- Murphy,

Shurtleff,

Weller, lution.

Nason,

Smith, of Santa Clara, West, Governor IRWIN. The gentleman will please take his seat.

Noel,

Smith, of 4th District, Wilson, of Tehama, MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I wish to appeal from the decision Ohleyer,

Steele,

Wilson,of San Francisco, of the chair, upon the ground that I have offered a resolution in refer- Overton,

Stevenson,

Winans—99.
ence to this very subject-matter, requiring the candidates to come for-
ward and define their position upon the true and only questions before

Barbour,
Herold,

O'Donnell, this Convention, and I insist upon it before a single vote is cast. (Calls

Barton,
Herrington,

O'Sullivan, of order.) I deny your right to silence me, sir. I want to know your

Beerstecher, authority. I am elected here by the sovereign people of the State of

Hughey,

Ringold,
Bell,
Hunter,

Smith, of San Francisco, California, and you are not. [Applause, loud and uproarious.]

Condon,
Joyce,

Soule,
GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentleman will come to order.

('ross,
Kenny,

Stedman,
MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I hold my seat on this floor by better

Dowling,
Kleine,

Sweasey,
authority than you do yours, and I want to know where your rules of
order are. I hold my seat on this floor by virtue of the sovereign will

Doyle,
Larkin,

Swenson,
Farrell,
Lavigne,

Tuttle, of the people of the State of California, and I know no rule of order.

Finney,
Lindow,

Vacquerel, [Applause.) I want to know where your officers are to enforce those

Freeman,
McCoy.

Walker, of Marin, rules. I hold that you have no rules; there have never been any

Freud,
Mottat

Wellin, adopted.

Gorman,

Morse,
GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentleman is out of order.

Wickes,
Grace,
Nelson,

White,
MR. BARBOUR. I am in order.

Harrison,
Neunaber,

Wyatı-45.
Governor IRWIN. The gentleman is out of order, and must take his
seat.

GOVERNOR IRWIN. Ayes, 99; noes. 45. The decision of the Chair MR. BEERSTECHER. Mr. President: I second the appeal, and stands as the decision of the Convention. indorse every sentiment the gentleman has uttered here.

Mr. O'SULLIVAN. Mr. President: I also hold that he has no right to be silenced.

MR. LAINE. Mr. President: I desire to ask the Chair whether it is Mr. O'DONNELL. I do the same.

now in order to make any nominations or whether there is anything in GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentlemen will take their seats; I desire the order, except to proceed to vote? Convention to

GOVERNUR IRWIN. Nothing is in order but to proceed to vote. MR. BARBOUR. Mr. President: I call for the ayes and noes on the MR. LAINE. Then, Mr. President, it seems to me that we should appeal.

proceed decently and in order. We are occupying no ordinary position MR. BEERSTECHER. I also call for the aves and noes.

here. It is not an ordinary Convention, but it is a Convention called Mr. O'SULLIVAN. I second the call for the aves and noes.

by the sovereign will of the people of the State of California, and the Governor IRWIN. The ayes and noes have been called for by the eyes of the whole State are upon us here. We should allow no haste gentleman from San Francisco, Mr. O'Sullivan, the gentleman from San or anything to control us in this matter. We should remember that Francisco, Mr. Beerstecher, and the gentleman from San Francisco, Mr. upon the floor of this Convention we are all children of the State of Barbour. I wish to make a remark to the Convention. It is necessary California--called together by her behest-not to represent any branch to preserve order in order to proceed with business, and there must be of her family or any particular interest or ism. But the sovereign State no applause. It is not the proper thing to either express approbation or has determined in her wisdom to reconstruct, so to speak, the political disapproval by persons in the lobby, nor is it, strictly speaking, by mem- fabric in which we have been dwelling for over a quarter of a century: bers of the Convention. Gentlemen who are members of the Čonven- And in order that this matter may proceed decently, in order, it would tion shall have their rights respected. I desire now. before this vote is be highly proper that we have regular nominations in this Convention, taken, to state the position of the question. The gentleman from Santa that all may be advised how to vote and for whom they desire to vote. Clara, Mr. Tully, moved that the Convention now proceed to vote for a Many of us are strangers to each other; all from distant parts of a State President of the Convention. That question was put. The gentleman that has a very large territory. In order that this matter may get from San Francisco, Mr. Barbour, sent up some resolutions to be read, properly before the House, in my judgment it would be proper that we The Chair ruled that the resolutions at this time were out of order, and have nominations. But we seem to have arrived at a position where we from that ruling the gentleman from San Francisco, Mr. Barbour, takes can only proceed to a vote. I think that perhaps the House did not an appeal. The question now is: Shall the decision of the Chair stand vote understandingly upon this question. I did not vote at all, because as the decision of the Convention?

when the question was voted on I believed that it would place us in MR. WATERS. Mr. President: I ask that the resolutions be read for some confusion, and I did not desire to spring up and make any noise in information. I would like to know what we are voting on.

the Convention, or to say anything. I am satistied that the Ilouse did Mr. O'DONNELL. Mr. President: I second that motion.

not vote understandingly, and in order that we may do so, I now move GOVERNOR IRWIN. The question is properly upon

to reconsider the vote by which we determined to proceed to an immediMR. INMAN. Mr. President: The gentleman is out of order. The ate vote. question is now whether the decision of the Chair shall stand as the Governor IRWIN. I understood the gentleman to say that he did decision of the Convention.

not vote. If any gentleman who voted in the affirmative on that GOVERNOR IRWIN. The decision of the Chair is based on this: After proposition will move to reconsider it will be in order. the Convention had decided to proceed to vote these resolutions are MR. LAINE. I believe the rule is ditlerent in the case of a viva introduced, and the decision is that they could not be read at that stage voce vote. of the proceedings, after the Convention had determined to proceed with GOVERNOR IRWIN. That is so. the ballot. After getting through with the ballot if the gentleman MR. MCCALLIUM. I second the motion to reconsider. chooses to call up the resolutions they will then be in order. (Cries of MR. ESTEE. It strikes me that no member will object to knowing “ Call the roll.”]

who the nominees before this Convention are to be. The Secretary proceeded to call the roll, with the following result: GOVERNOR IRWIN. The question is on the motion to reconsider the

vote by which the Convention decided to proceed to a vote.

MR. MURPHY. I move that the order of business be temporarily Andrews, Cowden, Hall,

suspended in order to give gentlemen a chance to put candidates in
Avers,
Crouch,
Harvey,

nomination.
Barnes,
Davis,
Heiskell,

GOVERNOR IRWIN. If there be no objection to that suggestion it will
Belcher,
Dean,
Huestis,

be done. If there is any objection, however, we can only proceed to a Berry,

Dudley, of Solano, Hilborn,
Biggs,
Dunlap,
Hitchcock,

MR. BEERSTECHER. I object to it. I desire to have the motion
Blackmer,
Eagon.
Hoge,

reconsidered.
Boggs.
Edgerton,
Holmes,

Mr. WEST. Mr. President: The law clearly defines the whole pro-
Boucher,
Estee,
Howard,

cedure in the organization of this House, and I believe, sir, in the Brown, Estey, Inman,

interest of order, it is best to follow the letter of the law as nearly as Burt, Evey, Johnson,

possible. It provides that we shall vote viva voce. The provision Campbell, Fawcett. Jones,

requiring the vote to be taken viva voce supposes that each member in Caples, Filcher, Kelley,

this Convention shall nominate his own candidate. A nomination Casserly, Garvey, Keyes,

would be entirely superfluous. It is not established by any precedent Chapman, Graves, Laine,

of parliamentary usage whatever, and would only occupy time. Each Charles, Gregg, Lampson,

gentleman of the Convention is sovereign in regard to the individual

AYES.

vote.

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reconsider will not prevail. "hom he may vote and to make his own choice. I hope the motion speech written I would suggest that he send his manuscript up to the

Secretary and have it read. It is certainly not to the question. HIILBORX. Mr. President: I hope we shall not reconsider GOVERNOR IRWIN. The Chair cannot undertake to prescribe just Fote. It is true, as has been stated by the gentleman from Santa what latitude a member may take. He may intend to bear upon the Clara, Mr. Laine, that we come here as the children of the State to question. [Laughter.] It is left to the judgment of each individual. Perise our Constitution. Let us not then adopt any of the ways of | 1 rule that the point of order is not well taken, and the gentleman will the politician; let us go at it and take a vote without any nomi- proceed with his remarks nations at all. Let the vote of each member be his individual pref- Mr. O'DONNELL. If it be conceded that the Workingmen's party erence for President. I shall vote for some gentleman as presiding represents the popular sentiment, and that it is numerically in the officer, not because he is the nominee of any particular party or elique, majority, then it will be well for this Convention to respect it. And we but I shall vote for him because I believe he is the best man to preside ask all delegates who sympathize with the mass in striking a blow for over us in this Convention. I believe that this is not the place to make liberty and justice to unite with us in sustaining the measures which we nominations, and that we should go on and vote, and vote for the best propose to incorporate into the new Constitution.

We demand a popuInan.

iar government-not in theory, but in practice. We demand that the Mr. BEERSTECHER. Mr. President: My position is that the vote mudsill of society shall be respected as much as the pillars of the edifice ought to be reconsidered. And when the gentleman who has just pre- which the mudsill supports. I ask that the party we have the honor to Geded me stated that he objected to the reconsideration of this vote, and represent, though nominally in a minority on this floor, be allowed to that we ought not to adopt the ways of the politician -- which are the divide with the majority the honors in organizing this Convention. Let exact words that he used-1 clearly and emphatically say that that is us consider, sir, that the eyes of the country are upon us; let us conjust the reason why I desire to have this vote reconsidered. If we go sider that this Convention is the initial movement of the great Presiinto noninations we know who the men are, and we can vote intelli- dential campaign of 1850. Every word uttered on this floor will be gently. If we vote in the dark, we vote a cut and dried ticket, made re-echoed and and manufactureri by the political trieksters and wire-pullers who have MR. REYNOLDS. If the gentleman will allow me a suggestion, I seats in this Convention. And therefore, Mr. President

would move that the further reading of his speech be dispensed with, MB. ESTEE. Mr. President: I beg to call the gentleman to order. and that fifty copies be printed. [('ries of " Second the motion.") My point of order is, that he says that political tricksters and wire- GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentleman will proceed with his remarks. pullers have seats in this Couvention. No gentleman in any delibera- Mr. O'DONNELL. I do not wish to detain this Convention one Live body has a right to use any such language.

moment, but I want a fair ileal. That is all I ask. I say that every Mr. ÁILBORN. Mr. President: I desire also to enter my protest. word uttered on this fluor will be re-echoed and reproduced in the disEverything that has been done here, except by the particular party tant East, and from this body the revolutionary party will take its cue. with which the genileman is associated, has been done openly and Our battle hymn will be their battle cry. And if we intend to lead in aboveboard.

ihe revolution we must engrave upon our tlag thoughts that breathe GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentleman will take his seat. The gentle and words that burn, and they will find an echo in the hearts of the man from San Francisco, Mr. Beerstecher, will keep himself within people. Mr. President, all I ask is a fair deal in this Convention. We the bounds of parliamentary usage so far as language is concerned. want to make our nominations, and put these candidates upon that

MR. BEERSTECHER. Mr. President: I did not intend to bring that platform, and know exactly how they stand before the people. We remark of mine to bear upon any individual at all. I made it as a bring a candidate before the people on popular principles-on antigeneral remark, and I am sorry that the coat fits some persons. As I monopoly: and I understand that the Non-Partisans will put up one said before, I am in favor of having the vote reconsidered and the that is a monopoly man. And for that reason I want these candidates Dominations brought to the attention of this convention.

to get upon the tivor, so that we may see precisely how they stand. We MR. BIGGS. Mr. President: I rise to a point of order. There never have got to make our record right here. bas been a vote taken upon the question. The question was to sustain ME. ESTEE. I want to call the gentleman's attention to the fact the decision of the Chair.

that when the question was first raised the Non-Partisan element were GOVERNOR IRWIN. The gentleman's point of order is not well taken. in favor of making nominations. I suggested myself to the Chair that The vole was taken, and a motion has been male and seconded to undoubtedly no gentleman would object to placing candidates in nomreconsider the vote, and upon that question the gentleman is speaking ination for the Presidency. Instead of that the gentleman froin San The gentleman will proceed with his remarks.

Francisco, Mr. Beerstecher, objecteil, and for that reason the gentlemen MR. BEERSTECHIER. For my part, I cannot see what the objection have made speeches and attempted to show that there was opposition to would be. I do not see that any gentleman can urge any tangible objec- it on the part of the Nou-Partisans, when there was none. The Nontion to our knowing exactly who are advanced here for the Presidency Partisans do not object to that measure. We are anxious and more than of this Convention. I hope that the motion will be sustained and that anxious that the fullest investigation should be made as to every man's the persons may be publicly nominated here, and that we may know character who shall be brought forward on this occasion. They have exactly what we are voting for on the very first ballot, and that we may nothing to conceal or hide. We are not here to make speeches, but to clearly and distinctly kuow the different aspirants. I am free to say work. And now, if the gentlemen desire to put their naines before the that I do not know the different aspirants, and I should like to voie Convention, in Goul's name let them do it. There can be no objection, intelligently. I desire to have the candidates brought up here publicly, and I am sure none will be made. that I may vote in daylight and not in darkness.

MR. HERRINGTON. Mr. President: It occurs to ine that if the genMR. WICKES. Mr. Presiilent: I believe that the decision of this tleman's advice is followed, who has just taken his seat, that the parliainatter is of great importance. The President of this convention holds mentary tactics he has endeavored to enforce would be simply carried an office of great importance, in the appointment of committees, and out. Instead, therefore, of arriving at the opinions and views of the we should know the status of those who aspire to that position. The candidates presented before the Convention, it would be siinply held by eyes of the people of California are upon us, and if there is any attempt the Chair that this Convention has no particular business but to proceed to gag the minority of this Convention, the people will know it. with the ballot, and the very object and purpose of such reconsideration

Mr. O'DONNELL. Mr. President and fellow delegates: This Con would be cut off. Now, if it is possible to get at the views and opinions vention constitutes an important event in the history of the world. of these candidates in reference to measures which are to be introduced The circumstances which brought it into existence are well known to in this convention and embodied in the constitution-if that idea can the world. The people were suffering great social and political wrongs. be reached as easily by the suggestion of the gentleman from San FranThere was sloth in the mart and schism in the temple; corruption in cisco, Mr. Estee, as by a reconsideration-I can see no possible objection office and out of it. Murmurs of discontent arose among the people. to it. But if the parliamentary tactics whiéh are sought to be engrafted In Pennsylvania and other Eastern States these murmurs ripened into on this motion to defeat a reconsideration are carried out, the precise deeds

order of business which the Chair has held to be in order will be re-inMe. INMAN. Mr. President: I rise to a point of order. The gen- augurated, and the Chair will decide that nothing is in order but to protleman is not talking to the question at all.

ceed with the vote, and we shall hear nothing more from the candidates MB. O'DONNELL. I am.

on this floor; and we would not understand a single solitary measure GOVERNOR IRWIN. I do not think the gentleman's point of order is that he would endeavor to enforce, and it would be said to us, “ It is not well taken. The gentleman from San Francisco will proceed with his to be presumed that any gentleman occupying the high position of remarks.

Chairman of this Convention would do anything wrong; it is not to be Mr. O'DONNELL. I was about to say that two years ago the people, presumed that he would treat any portion of the Convention unfairly, without leaders and without organization, arose and wreaked vengeance for that he would be biased in making up the committees," and I know upon the overshadowing monopolies which they truly regarded as the it would be high presumption in me to say that any distinguished genauthors of their calamities. It is therefore certain that this sentiment tleman occupying the position of President of this body would descend of popular distrust and discontent is not local nor peculiar to California. to favor the majority and oppress the minority. That is the way that It is widespread and pervades the entire nation. Mr. President, you business is usually conducted. It is always so exceedingly on the square and I will be able to see the party of the people take the reins of power. that no man can object. When a distinguished gentleman occupies the I assert that they are at this moment in a vast majority, not only in high position of President he can do nothing wrong; he cannot stoop this state, but in all the States of the Union. The circumstance ihat to appoint committees that would do anything mfair. But unfortutheir delegates are nominally in a minority in this Convention is due nately it so happens that in carrying out their views they generally solely to a want of organization in the counties remote from the appoint their particular friends on committees, and by that means metropolis. In many counties the Workingmen had no tickets printed strangle the very best measures that are put forward in the Convention. for the voters, and they were perforce compelled to select from the can. Now, it is simply a fair deal that we want. We do not ask for anything didates on the opposition tickets in the field. San Francisco is true to We want to understand what the gentlemen's views are who are the core-true to the principle of popular liberty. She is the great put forward for President of the Convention. When we have their center from which our organization takes its inpulse, and its grand for- views we will understand distinctly what we are to expect when they ward movement in this political revolution.

occupy that chair. There are many distinguished men in this ConvenMR. INMAN. I rise to a point of order, that the gentleman is not tion who are more or less warped by party prejudices. They are all talking to the question before the house. As the gentleman has his more or less affected by it. They are all more or less striped in that

more.

XOMINATIONS.

regard, and I don't pretend that I am wholly devoid of party prejudice, again, that the line here is not between the Workingmen, the Demoand I admit that if I should happen to occupy a position of that kind-crats, the Republicans, the Non-Partisans, or what not, but monopoly on and God forbid that I ever should aspire to it--I admit that I have some the one hand and anti-monopoly upon the other. When I took my seat party feeling, as far as my own party measures are concerned, that in this Convention, when I became qualified as a member of the Conwould affect the Constitution. I would like to see my friends upon the vention, the mantle of party falls from me, sir, and I undertake to repcomunittees, and I believe the gentleman from San Francisco would resent the people of the State of California and my constituency of the likewise. That is the only question. We simply want to know what | City of San Francisco. Thirty-three thousand voters of this State have these candidates think; what their views are; what their feelings are: expressed by distinct and positive and written propositions what they what they intend to do as to measures that shall be sought to be engrafted want us to do here. Now, sir, on behalf of the people, on behalf of on the Constitution. If they will voluntarily get up and state clearly those electors, I demand that this Convention be organized in the interwhat their views are—if they will do this, I will consent that the motion est of what I understand to be the wishes of a majority of the people of shall be reconsidered. Otherwise, I want to know, before I vote, the the State of California; which are, that the power of corporations shall be changes they propose to make in the old instrument, or what ideas they restrained; which are, that monopolies shall be broken up; which are, have in reference to the revision of it.

that the Chinese nuisance shall be abated; which are, that political corMR. RINGGOLD made some remarks, but owing to the noise and con- ruption shall be expelled from our public places. These, sir, are the fusion, it was utterly impossible to hear them at the reporter's desk. great propositions which we are to embody, or which ought to be embo

MR. BEERSTECHER. Mr. President: I move the previous question. died, in the new Constitution. All the others are secondary. These are Mr. MCCALLUM. Mr. President: I have no doubt, sir, that a large the main propositions. They tell you that the Workingmen's party is majority of this Convention, by whomsoever they may have been revolutionary; they tell you that it entertains wild and Communistic elected, desire to arrive at a speedy result upon the pending question. ideas; that it proposes to break the foundations of society; that it proI respectfully submit that there are only two ways to get out of it, in poses to level and to disorganize. But I assure you, sir, it is untrue. It view of the objection raised by the gentleman from San Francisco, Mr. is that system of misrepresentation whereby the public mind has been Beerstecher, to have the candidates come forward and express their poisoned with regard to the spirit and purposes of this people. They are views, and have them nominated. I submit, with all deference, that men, sir, in rebellion I admit, but as righteous a rebellion as ever was the difficulty arises on the misconstruction of the motion adopted. In sanctified by the blood and tears of a suffering people. They are rebels, I all cases, when a Convention resolves to proceed to elect, in legislative admit it; but they have rebelled, sir, against the oppressions of those very bodies as well as elsewhere, it is parliamentary usage to make nomina- things that we are here to restrain; this corrupt greed, these monopolies, tions. It is true that the general resolutions read: • That we now the Chinese curse, and political corruption. It is a rebellion that we are proceed to vote.” If the author had left out the word now," it would engaged in, and that rebellion will go on until it is triunphant, and then it mean the same-that we proceed to vote. But the rule has been in all may become revolution. If we are revolutionary that way I am willing bodies of this kind to proceed and nominate, without objection from to concede it; no further. Now, Mr. Chairman, I don't propose to tresanybody. But as the Chair has ruled the other way, unless the Chair pass upon the time of this Convention, but I will say this to the gentlesees proper, with the unanimous consent of the Convention, or with a men here: I have no desire and no design to go one quarter of an inch majority consent, to change that unusual construction, the only way outside the Constitution of my country. I entertain no un-American out of the difficulty is to reconsider, in which case we must also vote ideas; I have no desire to root out the foundations of society or throw down the original resolution, and then proceed to put some final resolu- down the social structure, or to impair any of the well known interests tion which will express what is evidently the desire of the other mem- of our country. What I want to do, sir, is to restrict and reconstruct the bers on this one point; that gentlemen may be nominated in the usual fabric which has been eaten into, and whose usefulness has been impaired manner, and that they be presented and allowed to speak to the Con- by reason of the causes I have stated. That, sir, is our purpose, and that vention before being voted for.

is all our purpose. In order, now, that justice may be done, in order The motion to reconsider was put and carried.

that the truth and the light may be let in upon this whole proceeding, Governor IRWIN. The question is now upon the adoption of the and, as one gentleman stated, the eyes of the State are upon us, which I original resolution. If there is no objection the candidates will now be admit, let us act in view of that fact, concealing nothing, suppressing placed in nomination. The Chair hears no objections.

nothing, voting openly and fairly after full consideration and reflection. Then the people will be satisfied, otherwise not. If gentlemen are pre

pared here with a cut and dried programme, to rush it through whether MR. JOHNSON. Mr. President: I nominate for President of this or no, it will be done, and the victim, I suppose, may be prepared for Convention W. J. Tinnin, of Trinity County

the sacrifice; but, sir, it shall not be done without my protest, which MR. BROWN. I do not think it necessary to speak in extraordinary shall go upon the record along with the act. But I hope better things, high terms of any gentleman I may nominate before this Convention, and when I stute objections, or any gentleman statés objections, to any or to say that he is superior to any other man, or to say that this Con- candidate here to-day, or when I propose a question, I hope no gentlevention cannot succeed without his services as Chairman of it; nothing man will raise a single objection to that question being answered and to of that kind. But I would present before the Convention a gentleman that gentleman being satisfied. He shall be as to my candidate or I will that I consider, in parliamentary tact and good judgment, at least the withdraw him. That is all I ask upon that. And in conclusion, sir, I equal of any man that may be named in this illustrious body. I there have the honor to place in nomination a gentleman who concurs with fore present the name of Volney E. Howard, of Los Angeles.

the views I have just stated; one who is distinguished, competent, expeMR. BARBOUR. Mr. Chairman: I have the honor to place in rienced, and who fills the bill, as I claim he will fill the bill completely, nomination for the position of President of this Convention a gentle and that man is Henry Larkin, of El Dorado. [Applause.] man long a resident of this State, having occupied official position by MR. BEERSTECHER. Mr. Chairman: I rise to second the nominathe choice of the people; a farmer connected with the agricultural tion of Mr. Larkin; and in seconding the nomination of Mr. Larkin, as industries of the country, whose record we submit in detail and as a one of the delegates from San Francisco, I desire to say that I recognize whole to the consideration and the most careful serutiny of this Conven- Mr. Larkin as being the exponent of those principles that we came here tion. We challenge the fullest, fairest investigation into each and every to represent. We have been basely and grossly misrepresented. We of his actions, and into his opinions. We ask the same right as to all are not agrarians, and we are not barn burners, and we are not disorganthe other candidates. The issues, I may say, the issue, that is depending izers, and we are not levelers, but we came here for the single and soliupon this event, sir, has been perverted, and is being industriously per- tary purpose of reconstructing the laws of this state, and to give the verted all over this State. It is not the issue, now at least, between the people of this State a better organic law than they possess to-day. If so-called Workingmen, Republicans, Democrats, Independents, or Non- the people of this State were satisfied with the organic law that they Partisans, but the line of demarcation is now drawn, and we draw it have, they certainly would not have voted to have another one substituted between monopoly on the one hand and anti-monopoly upon the other. in its place. But it is because the people are not satisfied that this ConWe mean it, sir, in its broadest sense. When I say " monopoly," I mean vention has been called, and the delegates from San Francisco, who any and all of those means whereby one man, or one combination of recognize Mr. Larkin, the gentleman just nominated, as the exponent of men, protected and governed by laws, or by the constructions that are their position in this Convention, came here for the purpose of giving to placed upon laws, appropriate to themselves and hold as against the bal- the people of the State of California an organic law that will be an improveance of mankind that common stock given by the Creator for the preser- ment upon the present one. We have not come here to create dissenvation of their lives, their comfort, and the support of those that are tion; we have not come here for the purpose of jumping upon the floor dependent upon them. By " monopoly," in its broadest sense, we mean at every motion, and to occupy the time of this convention, and I hope every and any form of special legislation. By “monopoly," we mean I may be excused if, in the preliminary organization of this Convention, the denial in any form, and in every form, to the people, in their sover- I have risen more frequently than some gentlemen have thought neceseign capacity, of the entire and absolute control of each and every of sary. But I hope that hereafter such will not be the case. Yet, the their creations. By “monopoly” we mean that system whereby, in the matter of electing a President of this convention is an important matter State of California especially, a wall is being raised up higher and higher in every sense. The President of this Convention will be the figurebetween the different classes of the community; on the one side luxury, head of the Convention, and we desire to stamp this Convention as the magnificence, and wealth, governing and controlling legislation, warping Convention of the people, and not as the ('onvention of monopoly. We the judgments of Courts, corrupting conventions and undermining the desire, and we came here for the purpose of restricting monopoly, but very foundations of society, and thus carrying devastation to the fair not for the purpose of disorganizing. We can see that corporations have fields of labor, prostrating all the industries of the country, creating rights, and we are willing to give them rights, but we also desire to have paupers where there never should be paupers, and creating destitution the rights of the people recognized. We came here for the purpose of and misery where there never should be destitution and misery. We joining with members from all portions of the country, from all parts of present a candidate who is devoted to the rights of labor, who respects the State of California, for the purpose of making a crusade against the the rights of capital, and against whom no taint or suspicion can justly aspirations of railroad companies and land monopolies, gas and water be maintained at all. We present a candidate who, like Cæsar's wife, is monopolies, and the lottery called stock gambling. We came here for above suspicion. There is his record, sir, made in the legislative halls. the purpose of making a crusade against the Chinese, and for the purScrutinize every vote: scrutinize every declaration; scrutinize every act. pose of reforming the taxation system, and the interest system, but we do We invite it; we invite it fully, and we ask gentlemen upon the oppo- not come here for the purpose of taking away any property that any man site side if they are willing to do us equal justice. We say, I repeat it has honestly acquired. We do not come here for the purpose of confis

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cating the property of any man, but we come here for the purpose of the people of the State of California, not of any ism, not of any party, bitan Pping the legalized system of confiscation, namely : by exor- not of any creed, but represent the people of the State in their organized

rates of interest, by which men's property is being confis- capacity, embracing every man, woman and child, and interest, within every day. We come here for the purpose of organizing a the State. I should not feel it to be entirely manly-and it would be a

system of taxation; we come here offering to the country mem- species of egotism on my part--to undertake to drill and instruct them hers to join them in their fight against their oppressors, We recognize here. They are answerable to the whole people of this State for whatthat the Granger element in this State has exactly the same fight to ever course of conduct they may take while in this august body. And I make that the honest artisan and mechanie in the City of San Fran- assume further, that all the men who are here, whether they be young cisco is making. And, gentlemen, I wish to make a prophecy before men in the vigor of life, with all those promptings of ambition that are this Convention, and that is this: Before ten days have gone by, just enough to make them firmly believe that their conceptions are the the sheep and the goats will be divided in this Convention, and you brightest, the purest, and the noblest of all, for that is the fault of young will see that the Workingmen's party, as represented here from San men, and I can hardly say that it is a fault, because, without the spring Franciso, will belong among the sheep, and not among the goats; of ambition and some inspiration even of egotism they will not accomyou will see that the Workingmen's party are honestly opposed to plish much-hut, while tolerating that, I have been taught to reverence these oppressions and burdens that now rest upon the people, and you the wisdom that age brings; I have learned, from the very earliest will see these very inen who came here with fair promises and fair periods of my life, that it is only age and experience that brings cultipledges, will be pitted against the interests of the people, as they always vated wisdom. It was said, in olden times, of that great commonwealth : have been pitted against the interests of the people. Now, gentlemen, Young men for war, and old men for council." We should have a a man's record ought to have something to do with the vote you are President of this Convention, allow me to say, in my judgment, whose casting here to-day, and perhaps to-morrow. There are gentlemen who are and experience we should reverence, and whose learning and ability will be offered, who have had it in their power for the last thirty years should challenge our admiration, because I have seen, in the short exhito make this the inost prosperous State in the Union. There are gentle bition that we have had here, that there will be storms and whirlwinds men who will be offered here for your indorsement or your rejection, in this ('onvention; that there are many here who imagine that they who have had it in their power to prevent the oppression of the monop- are crusaders, with lance in rest, against the crescent, or something else. oly and the misuse of corporation powers, but they have not done it. I have no doubt that in these feelings they are as honest as I am. I do They have not listed their fingers against anything of that kind. The not desire to impugn anybody's motives. It is not the language of parhard times that are upon us, and the oppression of the people, could liamentary debate or discussion, nor is it the feeling of a heart prompted been arrested by these men, and they have not been willing to arrest | only for the public good; and in these matters I beg you, now, gentlethem. We offer Mr. Larkin's record as the exponent agaiust oppression men, to create no parties and no factions. I care not from what country and against monopolies in all its forms. We challenge any gentleman a man may come, what constituency sent him here. Put it in good old to come up here and say aught against Mr. Larkin's public life. And in English; let me know your proposition, and then, if it be wrong, I will conclusion, let me say that the record that will be made by this con- be able to reason with him and point out to him the errors of it, or he vention is a record for life and for political death to every member here. me. But we are not to judge of a man or measures until we have heard We may put a Constitution in the field that the people will reject, and them fairly discussed; and it is a wrong conviction, in my judgment, to if they do reject the definitions or provisions contained in that new imagine that we represent any particular ism or constituency. Constitution they will be repudiated and rejected by the people. The from the good old County of Santa Clara. My election there was unsopeople have reasoned, and they have said there must be a revision of licited. am not sent here to work for the County of Santa Clara, but, the laws of this state, and the same people who have called this con- to the best of my ability, to watch over the interests of the entire State. vention here will repudiate the men who stand upon this floor in favor They will not be satistied with any speeches of mine; they will point to of monopolies and corporations, and oppressions generally. Gentlemen, my works, and will say, " Where is the work of your hands? Show me I call your attention to the fact that it is important that we place a figure what you have createid.” The candidate that I shall propose in this head here, right upon the first day, whom the people can indorse. If we Convention, I shall wait until his labors are performed, and then point do not do this, if we oppose the will of the people, we are opposed to to those labors. Withont further prolonging what I have to say-because, the current of a Niagara, and it is sure to swamp us in the end. This I find frequently that long talk does no good—I desire to bring to the will be our political life or death in this Convention, and I hope that, as attention of this Convention a gentleman ripe with age, decision, and we offer Mr. Larkin to you, you will accept Mr. Larkin. I am confident titness of character. I need not tell you that I refer to Colonel Hoge, of you will find us from San Francisco standing side by side with you, San Francisco, that I now nominate for President of this convention. fighting against all the monopolies that I have enumerated. repel GOVERNOR IRWIN. Are there any other nominations? and repudiate the idea that I am a communist and disorganizer. I MR. BARBOUR then called up his resolutions, which were read by came here to vote for the interests of all the people of this state. I the Secretary, for information, as follows: came here representing the poor man, and I came bere representing the

Resolred, That all persons proposed as candidates for President, and President pro rich man; I came here for the purpose of protecting the poor man's tem, of this Convention, shall be required, before being voted før, to come forward interest, and also for the purpose of protecting the rich man's interest. and define their position on the following propositions: First-Whether the state has I do not desire the confiscation of property, and therefore let us, in our

the power to control railroad corporations, in the regulativn of fares and freights; in first aet, stamp this Convention as the Convention of the people. Let preventing and prohibiting discriminations; in prohibiting the consolidation of is not put up some old fossil, who has been in the interest of corpora- their stock; in requiring frequent sworn public reports of the proceedings of their tions and monopolies ever since he was born, some time when this Directors or Trustees and of their business; in requiring them to allow the agents century was first commenced. Let us place a live, sterling, energetic of the state appointed for that purpose, and the stuckholders, to inspect their books; · man here, a man whom the people have sent here with a handsome in requiring all intending corporations to file an executed acceptance of such promajority, and don't place any gentleman who is better known abroad visions of it Constitution prior to granting them any charter, and in debarring all

existing corporations from all future privileges or legislation unless they also file than he is in his own home, who has been repudiated by the people in such acceptance; and whether the candidate is in favor of the exercise of such or bis own home, and is obliged to be elected by the people on the outside, similar power? Second-Whether he is opposed to land monopoly, and in favor of who don't know his ways.

using the power of the State to wipe it out? Third-Whether he is in favor of subMR. DOWLING. Mr. President: I rise to indorse the nomination of jecting all incorporated companies furnishing water or gas to incorporated cities or Mr. Larkin. From what I have heard regarding him, why he certainly towns, to the control of such cities or towns, in respect to the rates they shall be must be a saint, and Mr. President, I certainly cannot help voting for allowed to charge for these necessaries of life Fourth--Whether he is in favor of

probibiting all lotteries, and declaring stock dealing on “ margins," "puts and calls," a saint as President of this Convention. I am wedded to no clan. I and similar devices, lotteries? Fifth-Whether he is in favor of abating the Chinese know no friends, I have no enemies in this vote. I came here to deal nuisance, and using the whole power of the State to do so? Sixth-Whether he is out justice to my constituents, as near as I can interpret what justice in favor of taxing mortgages and reducing the rate of interest ? means. And, Mr. President, in dealing out justice, I am only trying to The Chair ruled that the resolutions were not in order for action, but carry out the will and the wishes and the dictates of my constituents. that any gentleman could express his views if he desired. I came here representing my constituents in their sovereign right. I No one appearing desirous of speaking, the roll was called with the came here, not to indorse anything that will rullle their prosperity, or following result: that will cast a shade of gloom over the community. My position in this tight is simply to look from the Sierras to the sea; (Andrews,

Kelley,

Nason, simply to look from San Diego to Siskiyou and try and throw the

Berry,
Larkin,

Ohleyer, mantle over my constituents-because I hold that I am representing the Burt,

Martin,

Smith, of Santa Clara, people of the State of California at large--to throw a mantle over them

Filcher,
McComas,

Townsend, that will be impervious to monopoly and political chicanery. We claim

Hale,
McConnell,

Webster--17. that the people of the State of California have been robbed of their Johnson,

Moreland, rights, robbed of everything that God Almighty provided for the com

We come here not to represent any clique or clan, but we eone here to represent the people. The people demand that we shall

Avers,
Heiskell,

Tinnin, do right. The people demand that these abominations that to-day gov. Blackmer,

Mansfield,

Walker, of Tuolumne, ern California and are dragging her down into the depths of misery and Brown,

Rolfe,

Waters-11. ruin, that they must be eradicated and that the people have the power Glascock,

Swing, to clean them out and preserve themselves and their sacred institutions. Mr. President, all I demand of this Convention I demand in the name of the imperial people of San Francisco. I demand that every man in Barbour,

Dean,

Grace, this Convention get up on this floor and state his views on all questions Barry,

Dowling,

Harrison, that now agitate the public mind. By so doing, Mr. President, I will Barton,

Doyle,

Herold, know for whom I am voting. But if you don't grant us this privilege, Beerstecher, * Evey,

Herrington, if this Convention tries to curb our rights here, Mr. President, we will Bell,

Farrell,

Hughey, cripple the Constitution when it goes before the people for ratification. Condon,

Finney,

Hunter, Mr. LAINE. Mr. President: I assume, in the very beginning, that Cross,

Freud,

Joyce, all gentlemen who occupy seats upon this foor are the representatives Davis,

Gorman,

Kenny,

FIRST BALLOT-FOR TINNIN.

fort of man.

FOR HOWARD.

FOR LARKIN.

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Kleine,
O'Sullivan,
Tuttle,

FOR TINNIN.
Lavigne,
Reynolds,
Vacquerel,

Andrews,
Johnson,

Moreland,
Lindow,
Ringgold,
Walker, of Marin,

Berry,
Kelley,

Nason,
McCoy,
Smith, of San Francisco, Wellin,

Burt,
Larkin,

Smith, of Santa Clara,
Moffat,
Soule,
West,

Filcher,
Martin,

Townsend,
Morse,
Stedman,
Wickes,

Glascock,
Metomas,

Webster -17.
Nelson,
Sweasey,
White,

Hale,

Metonnell,
Neunaber,
Swenson,
Wyatt--49.

POR HOWARD.
O'Donnell,

Ayers,
Heiskell

Swing,
FOR HOGE.

Blackmer,
Mansfield,

Tinnin,
Barnes,
Hager,
Reddy,

Brown,
Ringgold,

Waters-9.
Belcher,
Hall,
Reed,

FOR REED.
Biggs,
Harvey,

Rhodes,
Boggs,
Heustis,
Schell,

Cowden,

Keyes-2.
Boucher,
Ililborn,
Schomp,
Whole number of votes cast.

147
Campbell,
Hitchcock,
Shafter,
Necessary to a choice

74 Caples, Holines, Shoemaker, Mr. Hoge received

70 Casserly. Inman, Shurtlett, Mr. Larkin received

49 Chapman, Jones, Smith, of 4th Dist. Mr. Tinnin received.

17 Charles, Laine, Steele, Mr. Howard received.

9 Crouch, Lampson, Stevenson,

2

Mr. Reed received. Dudley, of Solano, Larue,

Stuart,

At one o'clock and thirty-five minutes P. M. Mr. Waters moved to take Dudley, of San Joaquin, Lewis,

Terry,

a recess for one hour.
Dunlar,
McCallum,
Tully,

Lost.
Eagon,
· McFarland,
Turner,

THIRD BALLOT.
Edgerton,
Miller,

Van Dyke,
Estee,
Mills,
Van Voorhies,

No choice being had on the second ballot for President, the roll was
Estey,
Murphy,
Weller,

again called, with the following result:
Fawcett,
Noel,
Wilson, of Tehama,

FOR HOGE.
Freeman,
Overton,

Wilson, of 1st Dist.
Garvey,
Porter,
Winans--67.

Barnes,
Hall,

Pulliam,
Graves,
Prouty,

Beleher,
Harvey,

Reddy,
Gregg,
Pulliam,

Bigte,
Heustis,

Reed,
Beggs,
Hilborn,

Rhodes,
Boucher,

Hitchcock,
FOR REED.

Schell,
Campbell,
Holmes,

Schomp,
Cowden,
Keyes,
McNutt-3.

Caples,
Inman,

Shatter,
Casserly,
Jones,

Shoemaker,
Whole number of votes cast

147
Chapman,
Laine,

Shurtleff,
Necessary to a choice

74
Charles,
Lampson,

Smith, of 4th Dist. Mr. Hoge received

67
Crouch,
Lewis,

Steele,
Mr. Larkin received.

49
Dudley, of Solano, Larue,

Stevenson,
Mr. Howard received

11
Dudley, of San Joaq'n, Martin,

Stuart,
Mr. Tinnin received

17
Dunlap,
McCallum,

Terry,
Mr. Reed received..

3
Eagon,
McFarland,

Tulley,
Elgerton,
McNutt,

Turner,
SECOND BALLOT.

Estee,
Miller,

Van Dyke,
Mills,

Van Voorhies,
No choice being had, the roll was again called with the following Estev,

Fawcett,
Murphy,

Walker, of Tuolumne, result:

Freeman,
Noel,

Weller,
FOR HOGE.

Garvey,
Ohlever,

Wilson, of Tehama,
Barnes,
Hall,
Reddy,
Graves,
Overton,

Wilson, of 1st Dist.,
Belcher,
Harvey,
Reed,
Gregg,
Porter,

Winans-71.
Biggs,
Henstis,
Rhodes,

Hager,

Prouty,
Boggs,
Hilborn,
Schell,

FOR HOWARD.
Boucher,
Hitchcock,

Schomp,
Holmes,
Campbell,

Shafter,

Avers,
Heiskell,

Swing,
Caples,
Inman,

Tinnin,
Shoemaker,

Blackmer,

Manstield,
Jones,

Brown,

Waters-9.

Rolfe,
Casserly,

Shurtleff,
Chapman,
Laine,
Smith, of 4th Dist.

FOR LARKIN.
Charles,
Lampson,
Steele,

Barbour,
Harrison,

O'Sullivan,
Crouch,
Larue,
Stevenson,

Barry,
Herold,

Reynolds,
Dudley, of Solano, Lewis,

Stuart,

Barton,
Herrington,

Ringgold,
Dudley, of San Joaquin, McCallum,

Terry,

Beerstecher,
Hughey,

Smith, of San Francisco,
Dinlap,
McFarland,
Tully,

Bell,
Hunter,

Soule,
Eagon,
MeNutt,
Turner,

Condon,
Joyce,

Stedman,
Edgerton,
Miller,
Van Dyke.
Cross,
Kenny,

Sweasey,
Estee,
Mills,
Van Voorhjes,

Davis,
Kleine,

Swenson,
Estey,
Murphy,
Walker, of Tuolumne,

Dean,
Lavigne,

Tuttle,
Fawcett,
Noel,
Weller,

Dowling,
Lindow,

Vacquerel,
Freeman,
Ohleyer,
Wilson, of Tehama,

Doyle,
McCoy,

Walker, of Marin,
Garvey,
Overton,
Wilson, of 1st Dist.

Evey,
Moffat,

Wellin,
Graves,
Porter,
Winans-70.

Farrell,
Morse,

West,
Gregg,
Prouty,

Finney,
Nelson,

Wickes,
IIager,
Pulliam,

Freud,
Neunaber,

White-19.
Gorinan,

O'Donnell,
FOR LARKIX.

Grace,

FOR TISSIN.
Barbour,
Harrison,

Reynolds,
Herold,
Ringgold,

Andrews,
Barry,

Johnson,

Moreland,

Nason,
Barton,
Herrington,

Kelley,
Smith, of San Francisco, Berry,
Beerstecher,

Larkin,

Smith, of Santa Clara,
Hughey,
Soule,

Burt,
Bell,

McComas,

Townsend,
Hunter,
Stedman,

Filcher,
Condon,

McConnell,

Webster-16.
Joyce,
Sweasey,

Glascock,
Cross,
Kenny,
Swenson,
Hale,

FOR REED.
Davis,
Kleine,

Tuttle,
Dean,
Lavigne,
Vacquerel,

Cowden,

Keyes—2.
Dowling,
Lindow,

Walker, of Marin,
Doyle,
McCoy,
Wellin,

147

Whole number of votes cast Evev,

74
Moffat,
West,

Necessary to a choice...
Farrell,
Morse,
Wickes,

Mr. Hoge received
Finney,

49 Nelson, White,

Mr. Larkin received Freud,

16 Neunaber, Wyatt-49.

Mr. Tinnin received Gorman,

9 O'Donnell,

Mr. Howard received
Grace,
O'Sullivan,

Mr. Reed received ..

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