Athletics and Literature in the Roman Empire

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 21, 2005 - Art - 398 pages
From the first to third century AD Greek athletics flourished as never before. This book offers exciting readings of those developments. Drawing on a wide range of evidence, it sheds light on practices of athletic competition and athletic education in the Roman Empire. In addition it examines some of the ways in which athletic activity was represented within different texts and contexts. Most importantly, the book shows how discussion and representation of athletics could become entangled with many other areas of cultural debate, and used as a vehicle for many different varieties of authorial self-presentation and cultural self-scrutiny. It also argues for complex connections between different areas of athletic representation, particularly between literary and epigraphical texts. It offers re-interpretations of a number of major authors, especially Lucian, Dio Chrysostom, Pausanias, Silius Italicus, Galen and Philostratus.
 

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Contents

V
1
VI
2
VII
7
VIII
22
IX
35
X
45
XI
47
XII
63
XXIII
205
XXVI
212
XXVII
225
XXVIII
235
XXIX
254
XXX
274
XXXI
301
XXXII
305

XIII
72
XIV
80
XV
97
XVI
102
XVII
132
XVIII
139
XIX
158
XX
163
XXI
180
XXII
186
XXXIII
315
XXXIV
325
XXXV
337
XXXVI
345
XXXVII
353
XXXVIII
379
XXXIX
390
XL
397
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About the author (2005)

Jason König is Lecturer in Greek and Classical Studies at the University of St. Andrews. He has written articles on a wide range of Greek authors from the Imperial period.

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