Transactions of The Indiana State Medical Association, Issue 31

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Page 122 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 328 - The obedience of a patient to the prescriptions of his physician should be prompt and implicit. He should never permit his own crude opinions as to their fitness to influence his attention to them. A failure in one particular may render an -otherwise judicious treatment dangerous, and even fatal. This remark is equally applicable to diet, drink and exercise. As patients become convalescent, they are very apt to suppose that the rules prescribed for them may be disregarded ; and the consequence, but...
Page 334 - Of differences between physicians. 1. Diversity of opinion and opposition of interest, may, in the medical as in other professions, sometimes occasion controversy and even contention. Whenever such cases unfortunately occur, and cannot be immediately terminated, they should be referred to the arbitration of a sufficient number of physicians, or a courtmedical.
Page 336 - It is the duty of physicians, who are frequent witnesses of the enormities committed by quackery, and the injury to health and even destruction of life caused by the use of quack medicines, to enlighten the public on these subjects, to expose the injuries sustained by the unwary from the devices and pretensions of artful empirics and impostors.
Page 335 - ... hygiene, and legal medicine. It is their province to enlighten the public in regard to quarantine regulations; the location, arrangement, and dietaries of hospitals, asylums, schools, prisons, and similar institutions; in relation to the medical police of towns, as drainage, ventilation, etc.; and in.
Page 330 - ... be desired. A physician afflicted with disease is usually an incompetent judge of his own case ; and the natural anxiety and solicitude which he experiences at the sickness of a wife, a child, or any one who, by the ties of consanguinity, is rendered pec uliarly dear to him, tend to obscure his judgment, and produce timidity and irresolution in his practice.
Page 328 - A patient should never weary his physician with a tedious detail of events or matters not appertaining to his disease. Even as relates to his actual symptoms, he will convey much more real information by giving clear answers to interrogatories, than by the most minute account of his own framing.
Page 326 - A physician should not only be ever ready to obey the calls of the sick, but his mind ought also to be imbued with the greatness of his mission, and the responsibility he habitually incurs in its discharge. Those obligations are the more deep and enduring, because there is no tribunal other than his own conscience to adjudge penalties for carelessness or neglect.
Page 336 - Physicians ought to use all the influence which they may possess, as professors in Colleges of Pharmacy, and by exercising ' their option in regard to the shops to which their prescriptions shall be sent, to discourage druggists and apothecaries from vending quack or secret medicines, or from being in any way engaged in their manufacture and sale.
Page 327 - To decline attendance, under such circumstances, would be sacrificing to fanciful delicacy, and mistaken liberality, that moral duty, which is independent of, and far superior to, all pecuniary consideration. 6. Consultations should be promoted in difficult or protracted cases, as they give rise to confidence, energy, and more enlarged views in practice.

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