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" If the labours of Men of science should ever create any material revolution, direct or indirect, in our condition, and in the impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present; he will be ready to follow the steps... "
American Quarterly Review - Page 508
edited by - 1836
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The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth - Fore-edge painting - 1828 - 340 pages
...the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of Meii of Science should ever create any material revolution, direct or indirect, in our condition, and in (he impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present, but...
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The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Volume 2

William Wordsworth - 1836 - 313 pages
...of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of Men...receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of science, not only in those general indirect effects,...
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Tait's Edinburgh Magazine

William Tait, Christian Isobel Johnstone - 1841
...and in their pursuits and manners, is only the interest of antiquarianism. Wordsworth has said — " If the labours of men of science should ever create...than at present, but he will be ready to follow the man of science, not only in those general indirect effects, but he will be at his side, carrying sensation...
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Alpha [by M.E.M. Jones. In verse].

Margaret Lawrence Jones - 1841
...of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of men...impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet will then sleep no more than as present, but he will be ready to follow the steps of the man of Science,...
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The Southern Quarterly Review

Daniel Kimball Whitaker, Milton Clapp, William Gilmore Simms, James Henley Thornwell - American periodicals - 1844
...Macaulay's Miscellaneous Writings. Milton— p. 20. "Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge — it is immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of...poet will sleep then no more than at present, but lie will be ready to follow the steps of the man of science, not only in those general indirect effects,...
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The Living Age, Volume 199

1893
...in the preface to the second edition of his poems, > I4YIKO Aos, No. 2567, p. 28. the labors of the men of science should ever create any material revolution,...receive, the poet will sleep then no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of the man of science, not only in those general indirect effects,...
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The Living Age ..., Volume 195

1892
...; it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all science. . . . If the labors of men of science should ever create any material...impressions which we habitually receive, the poet will sleep no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of science, not only in those general...
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The Poems of William Wordsworth ...

William Wordsworth - Authors' presentation copies - 1845 - 619 pages
...of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry U the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of Men...receive, the Poet will sleep then no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of science, not only in those general indirect effects,...
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The Poems of William Wordsworth, D.C.L., Poet Laureate, Etc. Etc

William Wordsworth - 1845 - 619 pages
...of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of Men...science should ever create any material revolution, direet or indireet, in our condition, and in the impressions which we habitually receive, the Poet...
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The Poems of William Wordsworth

William Wordsworth - 1849 - 619 pages
...of sensation in which to move his wings. Poetry is the first and last of all knowledge — it is as immortal as the heart of man. If the labours of Men...in the impressions which we habitually receive, the Pnet will sleep then no more than at present ; he will be ready to follow the steps of the Man of science,...
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