The History of Immigration and Racism in Canada: Essential Readings

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Barrington Walker
Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2008 - History - 305 pages
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This outstanding collection examines the complex and disturbing history of immigration and racism in Canada. Major themes include Native/non-Native contact, migration and settlement in the nineteenth century, immigrant workers and radicalism, human rights, internment during WWII, and racism of the present day.

The readings are divided into five cohesive sections:
  • Natives and Newcomers in Early Canada
  • Space and Racialized Communities
  • Dangerous Others-Non-Citizens and the State
  • Gate-keeping-Enemies Without and Within
  • The Post-War Era-New Rights and New Racisms

This book is destined to make its mark in History departments across the country and will also be of interest to students and researchers in Canadian Studies, Sociology, Demography, Political Science, and Geography.
 

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Contents

Chapter 1
17
Chapter 2
27
Chapter 3
41
Chapter 4
49
Chapter 5
69
Chapter 6
82
Chapter 7
90
Chapter 8
109
Chapter 12
175
Chapter 13
189
Chapter 14
205
Chapter 15
221
Chapter 16
239
Chapter 17
250
Chapter 18
264
Chapter 19
279

Chapter 9
125
Chapter 10
142
Chapter 11
158
Copyright Acknowledgement
302
Back Cover
307
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Barrington Walker is Associate Professor in the Department of History at Queen's University. His research interests are Black Canadian history and the histories of race and immigration in Canada.

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