The Naturalist's Library, Volume 4

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W. H. Lizars, 1833
 

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Page 220 - Dark is his hide on either side, but the blood within doth boil, And the dun hide glows, as if on fire, as he paws to the turmoil. His eyes are jet, and they are set in crystal rings of snow ; But now they stare with one red glare of brass upon the foe. xI. Upon the forehead of the bull the horns stand close and near, From out the broad and wrinkled skull, like daggers they appear...
Page 210 - A small saddle of plaited rushes is laid on him, when sacks made of goatskins, and filled with corn, are lashed on his broad and able back. A leather thong is passed through the cartilage of his nose, and serves as a bridle, while on the top of the load is mounted the owner, his wife, or his slave.
Page 219 - Beneath the oak trees was he nursed, — this proud and stately steer. Dark is his hide on either side, but the blood within doth boil, And the dun hide glows, as if on fire, as he paws to the turmoil: His eyes are jet, and they are set in crystal rings of snow; But now they stare with one red glare of brass upon the foe.
Page 186 - The nyl-ghau, with the quickness of lightning, darted against the wood-work with such violence, that he broke it to pieces, and broke off one of his horns close to the root, which occasioned the animal's death.
Page 219 - Gazul, turn," the people cry — the third comes up behind, Low to the sand his head holds he, his nostrils snuff the wind ; The mountaineers that lead the steers, without stand whispering low, " Now thinks this proud alcayde to stun Harpado so?
Page 218 - The deeds they've done, the spoils they've won, fill all with hope and trust; Yet, ere high in heaven appears the sun, they all have bit the dust.
Page 228 - There is still another place, built in the form of a Theatre, which serves for the baiting of Bulls and Bears ; they are fastened behind, and then worried by great English bull-dogs; but not without great...
Page 45 - two leopards," says the same biographer, " that were kept chained in an out-house, had broken from their confinement, and got into the yard among some dogs, which they immediately attacked. The howling this produced alarmed the whole neighbourhood. Mr. Hunter ran into the yard to see what was the matter, and found one of them getting up the wall to make his escape, the other surrounded by the dogs. He immediately laid hold of them both, and carried them back to their den ; but as soon as they were...
Page 220 - Once more, once more; — in dust and gore to ruin must thou reel — In vain, in vain thou tearest the sand with furious heel — In vain, in vain, thou noble beast, I see, I see thee stagger, Now keen and cold thy neck must hold the stern alcayde's dagger...
Page 229 - Time) a guard is appointed for the passing of travellers through the same without hurt. That none have any iron upon their bull-clubs or other staff which they pursue the bull with. Which proclamation made, and the gates all shut up, the bull is turned out of the Alderman's house, and then...

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