The Indigenous Experience: Global Perspectives

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Roger Maaka, Chris Andersen
Canadian Scholars’ Press, 2006 - Social Science - 366 pages
The Indigenous Experience: Global Perspectives introduces upper-level undergraduate students to some of the richness and heterogeneity of Indigenous cultures. Written by top scholars in the field, the readings explore common themes and experiences of indigeneity that persist across geographic borders. The first section examines the processes of conquest and colonization, while the second section addresses genocide and the problem of intention. The remaining readings interrogate the social constructs and myths promulgated by colonialism and explore the politics of resistance, struggles for justice, and future models of constructive engagement.

The examples span the globe from the Indigenous nations of Turtle Island--such as the Plains Cree, the Haudenosaunee nation of Kahnawake, and the Métis--to the original peoples of the South Pacific, including Aboriginal Australians, the Maori of Aotearoa, and the Rapanui. Other Indigenous peoples represented in this volume include the Guaraní, the Saami, the Ainu, and the Ogoni people. Combining historical narratives with complex conceptual issues and strong pedagogical support, The Indigenous Experience is a welcome addition to the literature of Indigenous Studies.
 

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Contents

Table of Contents
iii
Preface
7
Introduction
10
Chapter 1
17
Chapter 2
30
Chapter 3
45
Chapter 4
72
Chapter 5
91
Chapter 12
174
Chapter 13
189
Chapter 14
206
Chapter 15
219
Chapter 16
249
Chapter 17
267
Chapter 18
286
Chapter 19
307

Chapter 6
115
Chapter 7
116
Chapter 8
125
Chapter 9
141
Chapter 10
150
Chapter 11
165
Chapter 20
322
Chapter 21
337
Appendix
361
Copyright Acknowledgements
363
Back Cover
369
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Roger C.A. Maaka is a Professor of Maori and Indigenous Studies at the Eastern Institute of Technology in Aotearoa (New Zealand). Formerly the Head of Native Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, he is a Maori expert and scholar. Dr. Maaka's research interests include Indigenous peoples' quest for equity.

Chris Andersen is Metis from Saskatchewan, and Associate Professor at the Faculty of Native Studies, University of Alberta.

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