A National Force: The Evolution of Canada's Army, 1950-2000

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UBC Press, 2013 - History - 368 pages
This landmark book dispels the idea that the period between the Second World War and the unification of the armed services in 1968 constituted the Canadian Army's "golden age." Drawing on recently declassified documents, Peter Kasurak depicts an era clouded by the military leadership's failure to loosen the grasp of British army culture, produce its own doctrine, and advise political leaders effectively. The discrepancy between the army's goals and the Canadian state's aspirations as a peacemaker in the postwar world resulted in a series of civilian-military crises that ended only when the scandal of the Somalia Affair in 1993 forced reform.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Professional Army?
10
2 Soldiers Civilians and Nuclear Warfare in the 1960s
53
3 The Army and the Unified Force 196367
75
4 Trudeau and the Crisis in CivilMilitary Relations
108
5 Reform Regimentalism and Reaction
150
6 The Plan for a Big Army
171
7 The Unified Staff and Operational Difficulties
217
8 Reform and Constabulary Realism
252
Conclusion
283
Notes on Sources
294
Notes
297
Bibliography
330
Index
337
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

Peter Kasurak retired in 2007 after leading the defence and national security sections of the Office of the Auditor General of Canada. He holds a PhD in military and diplomatic history from Duke University and teaches part-time at the Canadian Forces College in Toronto.

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