The works of Samuel Johnson, Volume 4

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Contents

Progress of Idleness
33
Political Credulity 11 Discourses on the Weather
41
Chap Page
44
Marriages why Advertised 13 The Imaginary Housewife 14 Robbery of Time
52
Treacles Complaint of his Wife 16 Druggets Retirement
57
Progress of Arts and Language
63
History of Translations
69
Gelaleddin of Bassora
75
Indians Speech to his Countrymen
81
Expedients of Idlers 18 Drugget vindicated 19 Whirlers Character 20 Louisbourgs History 21 Lingers History of Listlessness 22 Imprisonment of De...
83
Amazonian Bravery revived
87
Sam Softlys History
93
Man does not always think 25 New Actors on the Theatre 26 Betty Brooms History 27 Power of Habit
98
Ortogrul of Basra
99
The good sort of Woman
100
Omars Plans of Life
101
Authors inattentive to themselves
102
No Page 29 Betty Brooms History
103
Corruption of News Writers
109
Disguises of IdlenessSobers Character
110
Sleep
113
Journal of a Fellow of a College
117
Punch and Conversation
122
Auction Hunter
126
The Terrifick Diction
129
Iron and Gold
133
Debtors in Prison
136
The Bracelet
140
Art of Advertising
147
On the Death of a Friend
148
Perditas Complaint of her Father
152
Monitions on the Flight of Time
156
Use of Memory
159
Portraits defended
162
Molly Quicks Complaint of her Mistress
166
Deborah Gingers Account of City Wits
170
The Bustles of Idleness
174
Marvels Journey 1
177
50
181
Domestick Greatness uvattainable
185
Selfdenial necessary
188
53
191
Mrs Savecharges Complaint
196
Authors Mortifications
200
56
201
Virtuosos whimsical
204
Character of Sophron the Prudent
207
Expectations of Pleasure frustrated
211
Books fall into neglect
214
60
216
95
343
Rangers Account of the Vanity of Riches
346
RASSELAS Chap 1 Description of a palace in a valley
377
The discontent of Rasselas in the happy valley
380
The wants of him that wants nothing
383
The prince continues to grieve and mu se
385
The prince meditates his escape
390
A dissertation on the art of flying
391
The prince finds a man of learning
396
The history of Imlac
397
The history of Imlac continued
401
Imlacs history continued A dissertation upon poetry
405
Imlacs narrative continued A hint on pilgrimage
408
1 The history of Imlac continued
412
Rasselas and Imlac receive an unexpected visit
420
The prince and princess leave the valley and see many wonders
421
The prince associates with young men of spirit and gaiety
427
The prince finds a wise and happy man
429
A glimpse of pastoral life
432
The danger of prosperity
434
The bappiness of solitude The hermits history
436
The happiness of a life led according to nature
439
The prince and his sister divide between them the work of observation
442
The prince examines the happiness of bigh stations
443
The princess pursues her inquiry with more dili
445
The princess continues her remarks upon private life
447
Disquisition upon greatness 450
450
Rasselas and Nekayah continue their conversation
453
The debate of marriage continued
456
Imlac enters and changes the conversation
460
They visit the pyramids
463
They enter the pyramid i
466
The princess meets with an unexpected misfortune
468
They return to Cairo without Pekuah
469
The princess languishes for want of Pekuah
472
Pekuah is still remembered The progress of sorrow
476
The princess hears news of Pekuah
478
The adventures of the lady Pekuah
480
The adventures of Pekuah continued
484
The history of a man of learning
490
The astronomer discovers the cause of his uneasiness
493
The opinion of the astronomer is explained and justified
494
The astronomer leaves Imlac his directions
496
The dangerous prevalence of imagination
498
They discourse with an old man
501
The princess and Pekuah visit the astronomer
504
The prince enters and brings a new topic
510
Imlac discourses on the nature of the soul
515
The conclusion in which nothing is concluded
519

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Page 411 - By what means," said the prince, "are the Europeans thus powerful ? or why, since they can so easily visit Asia and Africa for trade or conquest, cannot the Asiatics and Africans invade their coasts, plant colonies in their ports, and give laws to their natural princes? The same wind that carries them back would bring us thither.
Page 501 - He who has nothing external that can divert him, must find pleasure in his own thoughts, and must conceive himself what he is not ; for who is pleased with what he is ? He then expatiates in boundless futurity, and culls from all imaginable conditions that which for the present moment he should most desire, amuses his desires with impossible enjoyments, and confers upon his pride unattainable dominion. The mind dances from scene to scene, unites all pleasures in all combinations, and riots in delights,...
Page 380 - The sides of the mountains were covered with trees; the banks of the brooks were diversified with flowers; every blast shook spices from the rocks and every month dropped fruits upon the ground.
Page 366 - it is of little use to form plans of life. When I took my first survey of the world, in my twentieth year, having considered the various conditions of mankind, in the hour of solitude, I said thus to myself, leaning against a cedar, which spread its branches over my head : ' Seventy years are allowed to man ; I have yet fifty remaining.
Page 408 - I soon found that no man was ever great by imitation. My desire of excellence impelled me to transfer my attention to nature and to life. Nature was to be my subject, and men to be my auditors: I could never describe what I had not seen : I could not hope to move those with delight or terror whose interests and opinions I did not understand.
Page 301 - The Italian, attends only to the invariable, the great and general ; ideas which are fixed and inherent in universal nature; the Dutch, on the contrary, to literal truth and a minute exactness in the detail, as I may say, of nature modified by accident. The attention to these petty peculiarities is the very cause of this naturalness so much admired in the Dutch pictures, which, if we suppose it to be a beauty, is certainly...
Page 379 - YE WHO listen with credulity to the whispers of fancy and pursue with eagerness the phantoms of hope, who expect that age will perform the promises of youth and that the deficiencies of the present day will be supplied by the morrow, attend to the history of Rasselas,1 prince of Abyssinia.
Page 458 - I cannot forbear to flatter myself, that prudence and benevolence will make marriage happy. The general folly of mankind is the cause of general complaint. What can be expected but disappointment and repentance from a choice made in the immaturity of youth, in the ardour of desire, without judgment, without foresight, without inquiry after conformity of opinions, similarity of manners, rectitude of judgment, or purity of sentiment ? " Such is the common process of marriage.
Page 469 - A king, whose power is unlimited and whose treasures surmount all real and imaginary wants, is compelled to solace, by the erection of a pyramid, the satiety of dominion and tastelessness of pleasures, and to amuse the tediousness of declining life, by seeing thousands labouring without end, and one stone, for no purpose, laid upon another. Whoever thou art, that, not content with a moderate condition, imaginest happiness in royal magnificence, and dreamest that command or riches can feed the appetite...
Page 394 - So replied the mechanist, fishes have the water, in which yet beasts can swim by nature, and men by art. He that can swim needs not despair to fly: to swim is to fly in a grosser fluid, and to fly is to swim in a subtler. We are only to proportion our power of resistance to the different density of matter through which we are to pass.

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