A popular treatise on diet and regimen, Volume 2

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Page 292 - Why rather, sleep, liest thou in smoky cribs, Upon uneasy pallets stretching thee, And hush'd with buzzing night-flies to thy slumber ; Than in the perfum'd chambers of the great, Under the canopies of costly state, And lull'd with sounds of sweetest melody...
Page 293 - Who take the ruffian billows by the top, Curling their monstrous heads, and hanging them With deafning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly," death itself awakes ? Can'st thou, O partial sleep ! give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude ; And in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king? Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 292 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains In cradle of the rude imperious surge...
Page 12 - But we their sons, a pamper'd race of men, Are dwindled down to threescore years and ten. Better to hunt in fields for health unbought, Than fee the doctor for a nauseous draught. The wise for cure on exercise depend : God never made his work for man to mend.
Page 12 - ... till such time as he should sweat ; when, as the story goes, the virtue of the medicaments perspiring through the wood, had so good an influence on the sultan's constitution, that they cured him of an indisposition which all the compositions he had taken inwardly had not been able to remove.
Page 12 - THERE is a story in the Arabian Nights Tales of a king who had long languished under an ill habit of body, and had taken abundance of remedies to no purpose. At length, says the fable, a physician cured him by the following method. He took a hollow ball of wood, and filled it with several drugs ; after which he closed it up so artificially that nothing appeared. He likewise took a mall, and after having hollowed the handle, and that part which strikes the ball, he inclosed in them several drugs after...
Page 49 - In summer, walking excursions to the Highlands of Scotland are common among the youth of our cities, and when proportioned in extent to the constitution and previous habits of the individual, nothing can be more advantageous and delightful. But not a season passes in which health is not sacrificed and life lost by young men imprudently exceeding their natural powers, and undertaking journeys for which they are totally unfit.
Page 293 - With deaf ning clamours in the slippery clouds, That, with the hurly, death itself awakes ? — Canst thou, O partial Sleep, give thy repose To the wet sea-boy in an hour so rude ; And, in the calmest and most stillest night, With all appliances and means to boot, Deny it to a king? — Then, happy low, lie down ! Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.
Page 361 - ... disordered states of the system, will well repay a careful perusal ; and we cannot conclude this notice of Dr. Robertson's treatise without cordially recommending it as a sound and practical work, fitted for reference both as a work of information on the subject, and as a guide to practice.
Page 217 - Next day about noon they proceeded on foot, but the traveller who had bathed was extremely feeble ; and though they had to perform a journey of a single stage only, as some part of it was difficult and mountainous, he was obliged to lake the assistance of a carriage which overtook them on the road.

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