The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: Including a Journal of His Tour to the Hebrides, Volume 3

Front Cover
Derby & Jackson, 1860 - Authors, English
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

1778
436

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 199 - Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.
Page 129 - Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find information upon it.
Page 113 - The greatest part of a writer's time is spent in reading, in order to write ; a man will turn over half a library to make one book." I argued warmly against the judges trading, and mentioned Hale as an instance of a perfect judge, who devoted himself entirely to his office. JoHNSON : " Hale, Sir, attended to other things beside law : he left a great estate.
Page 450 - What, sir! about a ghost?" JOHNSON (with solemn vehemence) : "Yes, madam: this is a question which, after five thousand years, is yet undecided; a question, whether in theology or philosophy, one of the most important that can come before the human understanding.
Page 270 - Pray give me leave, Sir; — It is better here — A little of the brown— Some fat, Sir— A little of the stuffing — Some gravy — Let me have the pleasure of giving you some butter— Allow me to recommend a squeeze of this orange ; or the lemon, perhaps, may have more zest." — " Sir, Sir, I am obliged to you, Sir...
Page 188 - A ship is worse than a gaol. There is, in a gaol, better air, better company, better conveniency of every kind; and a ship has the additional disadvantage of being in danger. When men come to like a sea-life, they are not fit to live on land.
Page 198 - You are sure you are welcome ; and the more noise you make, the more trouble you give, the more good things you call for, the welcomer you are. No...
Page 208 - Very little business appeared to be going forward in Lichfield. I found however two strange manufactures for so inland a place, sail-cloth and streamers for ships ; and I observed them making some saddle-cloths, and dressing sheepskins : but upon the whole, the busy hand of industry seemed to be quite slackened. ' Surely, Sir, (said I,) you are an idle set of people.' ' Sir, (said Johnson,) we are a city of philosophers, we work with our heads, and make the boobies of Birmingham work for us with...
Page 78 - Your rage I defy. Your abilities, since your Homer, are not so formidable; and what I hear of your morals inclines me to pay regard not to what you shall say, but to what you shall prove. You may print this if you will.
Page 305 - Th' oblivious grave's inviolable shade. Let one great payment every claim appease, And him who cannot hurt, allow to please ; To please by scenes, unconscious of offence, By harmless merriment or useful sense. Where aught of bright or fair the piece displays, Approve it only — 'tis too late to praise. If want of skill or want of care appear, Forbear to hiss; — the poet cannot hear. By all, like him, must praise and blame be found, At last a fleeting gleam, or empty sound.

Bibliographic information