The Metropolitan, Volume 21

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James Cochrane, 1838 - English literature
 

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Page 126 - House, for the patience with which they have heard me now move, — That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, praying that her Majesty will be graciously pleased to direct...
Page 323 - Nor wanting, at wide intervals, the bulk Of ancient minster lifted above the cloud Of the dense air, which town or city breeds To intercept the sun's glad beams...
Page 230 - Nothing can convince tyrants of their folly but gunpowder and steel, so put your trust in God my boys and keep your powder dry.
Page 125 - House and the public may be able to place reliance; and declaring, with all deference to the constitutional prerogative of the Crown, that her Majesty's present Secretary of State for the Colonies does not enjoy the confidence of this House or of the country.
Page 55 - Duncan is in his grave; After life's fitful fever he sleeps well; Treason has done his worst: nor steel, nor poison, Malice domestic, foreign levy, nothing Can touch him further.
Page 356 - ísa remarkably fine-looking man. He is about the usual height, and of good figure. His countenance is mild and pleasant, and has a highly intellectual expression. His eyes are clear and quick. His eyebrows are dark and rather prominent. There is not a dandy in the House but envies what Truefit would call his
Page 70 - ... deeds done in the body, whether they be good or whether they be evil...
Page 273 - Alas ! the love of women ! it is known To be a lovely and a fearful thing ; For all of theirs upon that die is thrown, And if 'tis lost, life hath no more to bring To them but mockeries of the past alone...
Page 109 - What mortal eye can fix'd behold? Who stalks his round, an hideous form, Howling amidst the midnight storm ; Or throws him on the ridgy steep Of some loose hanging rock to sleep...
Page 77 - Lordship would often say that he better liked Mr. Hobbes's taking his thoughts, than any of the others, because he understood what he wrote, which the others not understanding, my Lord would many times have a hard task to make sense of what they writt.

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