The Crisis of Identity in Contemporary Japanese Film: Personal, Cultural, National

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BRILL, 2008 - Performing Arts - 223 pages
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This study, from a variety of analytical approaches, examines ways in which contemporary Japanese film presents a critical engagement with Japan's project of modernity to demonstrate the 'crisis' in conceptions of identity. The work discusses gender, the family, travel, the 'everyday' as horror, and ways in which animated films can offer an ideal space in which an ideal conception of identity may emerge and thrive. It presents close, theoretically-informed textual analyses of the thematic issues contemporary Japanese films raise, through a wide range of genres, from comedy, family drama, and animation, to science fiction and horrror by directors such as Kurosawa Kiyoshi, Morita Yoshimitsu, Miike Takashi, Oshii Mamoru, Kon Satoshi, and Miyazaki Hayao, in language that is accessible but precise.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Chapter One Contextualising Identity in Contemporary Japanese Film
29
the Look and the Voice
53
Chapter Three Families Crisis and Film
79
Who Are You?
105
Chapter Five Travelling Toward the Self in Japanese Film
135
Chapter Six The HumanPosthuman in Japanese Animation
159
Drawing a Line Between the Real and the Ideal
185
Conclusion Looking for the Face in the Frame
213
Bibliography
217
Index
221
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Timothy Iles, Ph.D. (1997) in Modern Japanese Literature, University of Toronto, is Assistant Professor of Japanese Studies at the University of Victoria. He has published on Japanese cinema, literature, and theatre, including Abe Kobo: an Exploration of his Prose, Drama, and Theatre (European Press Academic Publishing, 2000).

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