Fan Fiction and Fan Communities in the Age of the Internet: New Essays

Front Cover
Kristina Busse
McFarland, Sep 17, 2014 - Literary Criticism - 296 pages
Fans have been responding to literary works since the days of Homer's Odyssey and Euripedes' Medea. More recently, a number of science fiction, fantasy, media, and game works have found devoted fan followings. The advent of the Internet has brought these groups from relatively limited, face-to-face enterprises to easily accessible global communities, within which fan texts proliferate and are widely read and even more widely commented upon. New interactions between readers and writers of fan texts are possible in these new virtual communities. From Star Trek to Harry Potter, the essays in this volume explore the world of fan fiction--its purposes, how it is created, how the fan experiences it. Grouped by subject matter, essays cover topics such as genre intersection, sexual relationships between characters, character construction through narrative, and the role of the beta reader in online communities. The work also discusses the terminology used by creators of fan artifacts and comments on the effects of technological advancements on fan communities. Instructors considering this book for use in a course may request an examination copy here.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
A Bibliography of Critical Works
33
A Brief History of Media Fandom
41
PART ID
55
FAN FICTION IN CONTEXT
61
The Romance of Pornography and
79
Genre Intersections Between Slash and
97
The Slash Palimpsest
115
Construction of Fan Fiction Character Through Narrative
134
Making Space
153
The Bisexual Erotics of Words
189
Slashing the Slasher and
207
Fannish Storytelling Through
245
Machinima
261
Contributors
281
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Karen Hellekson is a freelance copy editor and independent scholar. She is coeditor of the open access journal Transformative Works and Cultures and of the quarterly SFRA Review. She lives in Maine. Kristina Busse teaches at the University of South Alabama and has published a variety of essays on fan fiction and fan culture. She is the founding coeditor of Transformative Works and Cultures.

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