Remains, Historical and Literary, Connected with the Palatine Counties of Lancaster and Chester, Volume 74

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Chetham Society., 1868 - Cheshire (England)
 

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Page v - ... what quantity of wood, how much meadow and pasture, what mills and fish-ponds, how much added or taken away, what the gross value in King Edward's time, what the present value, and how much each free-man or soch-man had or has.
Page 4 - Alice his wife and the Heirs of their Bodies, Remainder to the Right Heirs of the said Thomas.
Page 111 - Asshton, of their swine, ye year of the reign of King Richard the Second after the conquest...
Page iv - Confessor ; the present possessor ; how many hides were in the manor ; how many ploughs were in demesne ; how many homagers ; how many villeins ; how many cottars ; how many...
Page 131 - But the same worthy person, when placed in his own snug parlour, and surrounded by all the comforts of an Englishman's fireside, is not half so much disposed to believe that his own ancestors led a very different life from himself ; that the shattered tower, which now forms a vista from his window, once held a baron who would have hung him up at his own door without any form of trial; that the hinds, by whom his little...
Page 1 - VicePresident, and twelve other members, including a Treasurer and Secretary, all of whom shall be elected, the first two at the general meeting next after a vacancy shall occur, and the twelve other members at the general meeting annually. 4. That any member may compound for his future subscriptions by the payment of ten pounds.
Page vii - III, the revenues of the Crown had been considerably diminished, by tenants in capite alienating without licence, and by ecclesiastics as well as laymen withholding from the crown under various pretexts its just rights and usurping the right of holding Courts and other Jura Regalia...
Page 94 - Day at ye dinner, if them like for to come ; but the saied tenants and their wifes, though it be for their ease not to come, they shal send neither man nor woman in their name, but if he be their son other their daughter dwellyng with them, unto the dinner. For the Lord is not bounden to feed save al only the gud man and the good wife> Also every tenant that plough has, shall plow two days, and he that half plough has shall plow a day, whether the Lord...
Page 121 - A large empty barn, or some such building, is provided for the lord's hall, and fitted up with seats to accommodate the company. Here they assemble to dance and regale, in the best manner their circumstances and the place will afford ; and each young fellow treats his girl with a ribband or favour.
Page 121 - The lord's music, consisting of a pipe and tabor, is employed to conduct the dance. Some people think this custom is a commemoration of the ancient Drink-lean, a day of festivity, formerly observed by the tenants, and vassals of the lord of the fee, within his manor ; the memory of which, on account of the jollity of those meetings, the people have thus preserved ever since. The glossaries inform us, that this Drink-lean was a contribution of tenants, towards a potation or ale, provided to entertain...

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