State and Society in the Philippines

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jul 6, 2017 - Political Science - 464 pages
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This clear and nuanced introduction explores the Philippines’ ongoing and deeply charged dilemma of state-society relations through a historical treatment of state formation and the corresponding conflicts and collaboration between government leaders and social forces. Patricio N. Abinales and Donna J. Amoroso examine the long history of institutional weakness in the Philippines and the varied strategies the state has employed to overcome its structural fragility and strengthen its bond with society. The authors argue that this process reflects the country’s recurring dilemma: on the one hand is the state’s persistent inability to provide essential services, guarantee peace and order, and foster economic development; on the other is the Filipinos’ equally enduring suspicions of a strong state. To many citizens, this powerfully evokes the repression of the 1970s and the 1980s that polarized society and cost thousands of lives in repression and resistance and billions of dollars in corruption, setting the nation back years in economic development and profoundly undermining trust in government. The book’s historical sweep starts with the polities of the pre-colonial era and continues through the first year of Rodrigo Duterte’s controversial presidency.
 

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Contents

Marcos 19651986
193
Democratization 19862004
230
The Rise and Fall of The Strong Republic
289
Cacique Democracy Personalized
311
NeoAuthoritarianism?
337
Glossary
349
Bibliography
353
Index
395

Nation and States 18721913
102
The Filipino Colonial State 19021946
134
All Politics Is Local 19461964
167
About the Authors
413
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Patricio N. Abinales is professor in the School of Pacific and Asian Studies, the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. Donna J. Amoroso (1960–2011) was associate professor at the National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, and editor of the Kyoto Review of Southeast Asia at the Center for Southeast Asian Studies, Kyoto University.

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