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CONTENTS of VOL. CCLXVII.

PAGE

Africa, From. By GRANT ALLEN

547

88

Aran, The Isles of. By GODDARD H. ORPEN.

Arcadian Extremes. By LANDLEY LEYBURN

279

70

Archives, Our. By ALEX. C. EWALD, F.S.A. .

Backing Cupid: à Tale of Royal ’Ascot. By CHARLES T. c.

JAMES :-

Chaps. I.-VI..

209

Chaps. VII.-X. .

313

Book-burner, A Royal. By J. A. FARRER

284

Book-Fires, Charles the First's. By J. A. FARRER
Book-Fires, Sixteenth Century. By J. A. FARRER.

43
British Climate, The. By ALFRED J. H. CRESPI

457

Campbor Forests and Eucalyptus Pine. By A. J. H. CRESPI

301

Carnac, The Giant Stones of. By GODDARD H. ORPEN

622

Chant de Golias. By B. MONTGOMERIE RANKING

Charles the First's Book-Fires. By J. A. FARRER.

Coffin Nails. By Rev. S. BARING GOULD, M.A.

570

Concerning Cycling. By W. ARMSTRONG WILLIS.

600

Deaf and Dumb, The: Teaching them to Talk. By J. G. SHAW

504

Dibdin, Charles. By J. CUTHBERT HADDEN.

D'Israeli the Novelist. By WILLIAM E. A. AXON.

177

Dream, A, of Dante. By ISABELLA J. POSTGATE

205

Dumas' Henri Trois. By H. SCHÜTZ WILSON

192

Early Mormonism. By FRED. BARRACLOUGH

339

Eucalyptus Pine and Camphor Forests. By A. J. H. CRESPI

301

Extremes, Arcadian. By LANDLEY LEYBURN

279

“Faust,” The Second part of. By H. SCHÜTZ Wilson

362

From Africa. By GRANT ALLEN

547
“Gentleman Pete." By A CONVICT

628
Giant Stones, The, of Carnac. By GODDARD H. ORPEN

622
Henri Trois, Dumas'. By H. SCHÜTZ WILSON

192
Ilfracombe and Lundy. By AN OLD OXONIAN

511
In New Zealand. By J. LAWSON

184

Ipplepen : Round and About an Old Devon Village. By W. G.

THORPE

407

Isles of Aran, The. By GODDARD K. ORPEN

" Jane Eyre," Some Reminiscences of the Author of. By FRANCIS

H. CANDY

King John, Under. By Alex. C. EWALD, F.S.A

414

614
Knapsack Expeditions. By HENRY M. TROLLOPE
Lady, The, of Lyons. By PERCY FITZGERALD

258
Log-Book, A. By W. H. PATTERSON

136
Lundy and Ilfracombe. By An Old OXONIAN

142

Migrants, Summer. By JOHN WATSON.

511

Molière, The Wife of. By GERALD MORIARTY

I21

Monastery, A Russian. By J. THEODORE BENT

20

238

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88

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Mormonism, Early. By FRED. BARRACLOUGH

339

My Portrait. By HENRIETTE CORKRAN

Myths of the Great Departed : a Study in Legendary Folk Lore.

529

By C. S. BOSWELL

Nature, The Romance of. By William SYDNEY :

434

54

New Zealand, In. By J. LAWSON

184

New Zulu Bonds. By W. H. STACPOOLE

Our Archives. By ALEX. C. EWALD, F.S.A.

70

Our West African Possessions. By H. R. Fox BOURNE

379

Portrait, My. By HENRIETTE CORKRAN

529

Queen, A Vagabond. By JAN WINN

266

Romance, The, of Nature. By WILLIAM SYDNEY .

Round and About an oid Devon Village : Ipplepen. 'By W. G.

54

THORPE

407

Royal Book-burner

, A. By J. A. FARRER

284

Russian Monastery, A. By J. THEODORE BENT

Sceptre and Pen. By W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS

147

Second Part, The, of “Faust." By H. SCHÜTZ WILSON

362

Sergeant Bell's Raree Show. By RICHARD HERNE SHEPHERD

Sixteenth-Century Book-Fires. By J. A. FARRER

43

Some Minor British Game-Birds : Woodcock, Plover, and Snipe.

By JOHN WATSON

447

Some Recent Scientific Advances. By ALFRED J. H. CRESPI

391

Some Reminiscences of the Author of “ Jane Eyre.” By FRANCIS

H. CANDY.

414

Study, A, in Legendary Fólk-Lore : Myths of the Great Departed.

By C. S. BOSWELL

Story, The, of the Coat. By W. H. DAVENPORT ADAMS

Part I.

487

Part II.

577

St. Spiridion's Day. By JAMES BAKER

294

Summer Migrants. By JOHN WATSON

121

Sun Dials. By LAUNCELOT CROSS

248

Swanage. By W. ARMSTRONG WILLIS .

354

Table Talk By SYLVANUS URBAN :-

Ibsen upon the English Stage---Mr. Swinburne's Poems and

Ballads-Poet and Prophet

103

Mr. Morris and the Strand-The Buil

Ring in Paris

207

Concordances

312

The Praise of Solitude – imaginary Travels_imaginary Life

on Mars.

419

A Scotch Girl--Biographies of Eighteenth Century Worthies : 527

Mr. Swinburne on Ben Jonson-Mr. Swinburne's Poetic Awards 631

Teaching the Deaf and Dumb to Talk. By J. G. SHAW

504

Under King John. By ALEX. C. EWALD, F.S.A.

614

Unsophisticated Travellers, The. By LYNN C. D'OYLE

105

Vagabond Queen, A. By JAN WINN

266

Valley, The, of the Shadow. By LYNN C. D'OYLE:

421

Village, A Yorkshire. By S. O. ADDY

33

West African Possessions, Our. By H. R. Fox BOURNE

379

Wife, The, of Molière. By GERALD MORIARTY

Woodcock, Plover, and Snipe : some Minor British Game-Birds.

By JOHN WATSON

447

Yorkshire Village, A. By S. O. ADDY

33

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PI RANCIS

parted.

is and

103 207

312 Life

419 nies. 527 vards 631

PART I.
WAS about twenty-eight years of age when I entered into párt

nership as a stock and share broker with Mr. Paul Tompkins à pompous, bustling, portly.looking personage, with a bald, domelike head, massive shirt front and general appearance of responsibility. Mr. Tompkins, who was my senior by some thirty years or more, found the clientèle and business experience, whilst I, or rather my father, a retired Army officer, provided the £5,000 capital with which we started. I may as well say at once that those £5,000 were all that I could ever expect to receive from my father, and that they were in fact more than I was strictly entitled to, regard being had to the rights of other members of our family. Having taken offices in Tokenhouse Yard, Mr. Tompkins and I commenced business in September, 1875, under the title of Tompkins and Ashley, Stock and Share Brokers.

From the moment we opened our doors we were busily and merrily at work-indeed rather uproariously so at times. The number of Mr. Tompkins's clients was legion. How or where he got them I am sure I do not know, but, comprising as they did representatives of nearly every order of gentility, they seemed to swarm the offices, or to follow him like the tail of a comet as he made his way to and fro between Tokenhouse Yard and the Stock Exchange, where, on their behalf , whole batches of orders were executed en bloc.

We had three VOL. CCLXVII, NO. 1903

504 614

105

266 421

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rooms in our offices : a clerks' room ; a private room, where Mr. Tompkins and I sat; and a large outer room for the accommodation of our clients. In the middle of this latter apartment stood an electrical apparatus which kept ticking away from 11 a.m. till 4.30 p.m. while it rolled off on a thin endless slip of paper, called “the tape,” the current prices of stocks and shares. The effects of this instrument on the crowd that stood round it all day were at once various and incessant. Sometimes the whole throng would quiver as though from an electric shock; sometimes there would be a heaving and a swaying in the mass; some pressing forwards with eager exulting faces, others pressing back with muttered expressions of hate or fear; while sometimes, though not often, the concourse, unable to restrain itself, burst into a loud cheer, to the very great scandal, as I then suspected, and subsequently learned, of a firm of Government brokers who occupied the adjoining offices. Mr. Tompkins, if he were present on such occasions, would hold up his hands, saying in a pathetic parental way:

"Oh, gentlemen, gentlemen,"

Whereupon there was usually a stampede to a neighbouring restaurant.

We did, or at least appeared to do, as much business as any six ordinary firms, and for some time I felt very much pleased and elated at being the Mr. Ashley of Tompkins and Ashley.

Gradually, however, I began to doubt the soundness of our business; so many of Mr. Tompkins's clients had a habit of absenting themselves if they lost, without paying their “differences”; then I found that Mr. Tompkins and I were contracting a habit of speculating on our own account; presently, to my intense annoyance, I had reason to think that we were looked upon rather askant in the "House.” Finally, about the beginning of December I was forced to the conclusion that Mr. Tompkins had entirely over-estimated his knowledge of the stock markets, that he had, in fact, no special knowledge of stockbroking whatever ; that his clients were nearly all of them "punters ” ; that my money was nearly gone, and that our firm was looked upon as a “bucket-shop.”

A “punter," I may mention, means a person who speculates for small amounts. At baccarat or on the Turf he operates, generally for shillings, half-crowns, crowns, or other the smallest amount the banker or bookmaker will accept. In this way he is distinguished from the s plunger” who operates for large amounts. A “bucket-shop " is a stockbroker's office which is frequented by and kept for the convenience of “punters.” Such institutions are, I may add, almost invariably owned by what are called "outside brokers," an industrious

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