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FIRST DIVISION

GENERAL PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO THE WHOLE REVISION,

THE POLITICAL AND CIVIL ORGANIZATION OF THE STATE, AND SANITARY, POLICE, AND Public COMMERCIAL REGULA

TIONS.

TITLE I.

GENERAL PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO THE WHOLE REVISION.

CHAPTER I.

GENERAL PROVISIONS.

1. (1) Definitions. In determining the meaning of these Revised General Statutes, words importing the singular number may extend or be applied to several persons or things; words importing the plural number may be applied to one person or thing; words importing the masculine gender may be applied to that which is female or neuter; the word “person” may extend and be applied to a corporation; "writing" includes printing on paper; the terms "insane person” and “lunatic" include every idiot, non compos, lunatic, and insane person; the term "megro" includes every person having oneeighth or more negro blood; the terms “colored person" or "persons of color" or "colored," as applied to any person, have the same signification as is herein attached to “negro," as aforesaid; the reference to any officer shall include any person authorized by law to perform the duties of such office, unless the context shows that such words were intended to be used in a more limited sense; and the requirements of an oath shall be deemed complied with by making affirmation in judicial form, and the word "oath" wherever used herein includes such affirmation.

TITLE V.

THE STATE ORGANIZATION.

CHAPTER I.

CERTAIN BOUNDARIES, ASSENT TO TERMS OF ADMISSION INTO THE

UNION AND CONCESSIONS TO THE UNITED STATES.

ARTICLE I.

CERTAIN BOUNDARIES.

Ch. 165. Acts 1848. Sec. 2.

2. (2.) Boundary between Florida and Alabama.—The line commencing on the Chattahoochee river near a place known as “Irwin's Mills," and running west to the Perdido, marked throughout by blazes on the trees, and also by mounds of earth thrown upon the line, at distances of one mile, more or less, from each other, and commonly known as the “Mound line” or “Ellicott's line," and by these names (listinguished from another line above, running irregularly at different distances not exceeding one and a half miles from the “Mound line” and marked by blazes only, and known as the “Upper line,” or “Coffee's line,” is the boundary line between the States of Florida and Alabama.

3. (3.) Boundary between Florida and Georgia.—The line run and marked by B. F. Whitner, Jr., on the part of Florida, and G. J. Orr, on the part of Georgia, is the permanent boundary line between the States of Georgia and Florida.

Resolution
No. 16, Feb.
8. 1861.

The survey of the boundary line as located by Orr and Whitner under the authority of the States of Georgia and Florida, having been adopted by the legislatures of the two states, as the true boundary line, and the same having been substantially ratified by Congress in 1872, that line is regarded as the settled boundary between the two states from the junction of the Flint and Chattahoochee rivers to Elliot's Mound on the St. Mary's River. Groover v Coffee, 19 Fla. 61.

That "grants hy a government de facto of parts of a disputed territory in its possession" are valid, and the rights to property so acquired “are respected and sacred." Ib.

When a doubtful or disputed boundary is settled by agreement between the states and duly ratified, such agreement does not operate retrospectively

to disturb titles to property. Coffee v Groover, 20 Fla. 64.

SO as

ARTICLE 2.

ASSENT TO TERMS OF ADMISSION INTO THE UNION, AND CONCES

SIONS TO THE UNITED STATES.

4. (4.) Assent to terms of admission into the Union.- Ch. 14 1845. The State of Florida assents as by the statute approved July 25, 1845, to the terms of admission of this state into the confederacy and union of the United States, and to the provisions of the acts of congress respecting the public lands of the United States in this State.

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Soc.

25, 1, 1845

5. (5.) United States authorized to acquire lands for cer- Ch.
tain purposes.—The United States are hereby authorized and
empowered to purchase, acquire, hold, own, occupy and
possess such lands within the limits of this State as they shall
seek to occupy and hold as sites on which to erect and main-
tain forts, magazines, arsenals, dockyards, and other need-
ful buildings, or any of them, as contemplated and provided
in the Constitution of the United States; such land to be
acquired either by contract with owners, or in the manner
hereinafter provided.

6. (6.) Condemnation of land when price not agreed upon.-If the officer or other agent employed by the United States to make such purchase and the owner of the land contemplated to be purchased, as aforesaid, cannot agree for the sale and purchase thereof, the same may be acquired by the United States by condemnation in the same manner as is hereinafter provided for condemnation of lands for other public purposes, and any officer or agent authorized by the United States may institute and conduct such proceedings in their behalf.

25

Sec.

3, 1845.

7. (7.) Jurisdiction over such lands, how ceded to the Ch.
United States. Whenever the United States shall contract
for, purchase or acquire any land within the limits of this
State for the purposes aforesaid, in either of the modes
above mentioned and provided, or shall hold for such pur-
poses lands heretofore lawfully acquired or reserved there-
for, and shall desire to acquire constitutional jurisdiction
over such lands for said purposes, it shall be lawful for the
Governor of this State, upon application made to him in writ-
ing on behalf of the United States for that purpose, accom-
panied by the proper evidence of said reservation, purchase,
contract or acquisition of record, describing the land sought

to be ceded by convenient metes and bounds, thereupon, in the name and on behalf of this State to cede to the United States exclusive jurisdiction over the land so reserved, purchased or acquired and sought to be ceded; the United States to hold, use, occupy, own, possess and exercise said Jurisdiction over the same for the purposes aforesaid, and none other whatsoever: Provided, always, That the consent aforesaid is hereby given and the cession aforesaid is to be granted and made as aforesaid, upon the express condition that this State shall retain a concurrent jurisdiction with the United States in and over the land or lands so to be ceded, and every portion thereof, so far that all process, civil or criminal, issuing under authority of this State, or of any of the courts or judicial officers thereof may be executed by the proper officers thereof, upon any person or persons amenable to the same, within the limits and extent of land or lands so ceded, in like manner and to like effect as if this law had never been passed; saving, however, to the United States security to their property within said limits and extent, and exemption of the same, and of said land or lands from any taxation under the authority of this State while the same shall continue to be owned, held, used and occupied by the United States for the purposes above expressed and intended and not otherwise.

Ch. 6.30, Acts 1855, Secs.

1

and 2.

8. (8.) Transfer of title to and jurisdiction over land owned by State.—Whenever a tract of land containing not more than four acres shall be selected by an authorized officer or agent of the United States for the bona fide purpose of erecting thereon a lighthouse, beacon, marine hospital or other public work, and the title to the said land shall be held by the State, then on application by the said officer or agent to the Governor of this State, the said executive is hereby authorized to transfer to the United States the title to, and jurisdiction over said land; Provided, always, That the said transfer of title and jurisdiction is to be granted and made, as aforesaid, upon the express condition that this State shall retain a concurrent jurisdiction with the United States, in and over the land or lands so to be transferred, and every portion thereof, so far that all process, civil or criminal, issuing under authority of this State, or any of the courts or judicial officers thereof, may be executed by the proper officer thereof, upon any person or persons amenable to the same, within the limits and extent of the land or lands so ceded, in like manner and to like effect as if this law had never been passed; saving,

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