WYOMING; ITS HISTORY, STIRRING INCIDENTS, AND ROMANTIC ADVENTURES.

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Page 15 - Betwixt them lawns, or level downs, and flocks Grazing the tender herb, were interposed, Or palmy hillock ; or the flowery lap Of some irriguous valley spread her store, Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose : Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant...
Page 15 - Of some irriguous valley spread her store, Flowers of all hue, and without thorn the rose : Another side, umbrageous grots and caves Of cool recess, o'er "which the mantling vine Lays forth her purple grape, and gently creeps Luxuriant; meanwhile murmuring waters fall Down the slope hills, dispersed, or in a lake, That to the fringed bank with myrtle crowned Her crystal mirror holds, unite their streams.
Page 271 - Out, alas! she's cold; Her blood is settled, and her joints are stiff; Life and these lips have long been separated: Death lies on her, like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.
Page 67 - ... race has filled These populous borders, — wide the wood recedes, And towns shoot up, and fertile realms are tilled ; The land is full of harvests and green meads ; Streams numberless, that many a fountain feeds, Shine...
Page 15 - Insuperable height of loftiest shade, Cedar, and pine, and fir, and branching palm, A sylvan scene; and as the ranks ascend Shade above shade, a woody theatre Of stateliest view.
Page 351 - There is, said Michael, if thou well observe The rule of not too much, by temperance taught In what thou eat'st and drink'st, seeking from thence Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight, Till many years over thy head return : So mayst thou live, till like ripe fruit thou drop Into thy mother's lap, or be with ease Gather'd, not harshly pluck'd, for death mature. This is old age...
Page 15 - So on he fares, and to the border comes Of Eden, where delicious Paradise, Now nearer, crowns with her enclosure green, As with a rural mound, the champaign head Of a steep wilderness...
Page 196 - Tunes her nocturnal note : thus with the year Seasons return, but not to me returns Day, or the sweet approach of even or morn, Or sight of vernal bloom, or summer's rose, Or flocks, or herds, or human face divine ; But cloud instead, and ever-during dark Surrounds me...
Page 21 - Name of the Council Established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, Ruling, Ordering and Governing of New England in America...
Page 278 - ... that flashed with many an oar, Where the brown otter plunged him from the brake, And the deer drank : as the light gale flew o'er, The twinkling maize-field rustled on the shore ; And while that spot, so wild, and lone, and fair, A look of glad and guiltless beauty wore, And peace was on the earth and in the air, The warrior lit the pile, and bound his captive there.

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