The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Begun in the Year 1641: With the Precedent Passages, and Actions, that Contributed Thereunto, and the Happy End, and Conclusion Thereof by the King's Blessed Restoration, and Return, Upon the 29th of May, in the Year 1660, Volume 3, Part 1

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Page 24 - And the men of Israel answered the men of Judah, and said, We have ten parts in the king, and we have also more right in David than ye: why then did ye despise us, that our advice should not be first had in bringing back our king? And the words of the men of Judah were fiercer than the words of the men of Israel.
Page 74 - Study of good Learning, and the practice of Virtue; and had inclination to that Duty and Obedience they had never been taught; so that when it pleased God to bring King Charles the Second back to his Throne, he found that University [Oxford] . . . abounding in excellent Learning, and devoted to Duty and Obedience, little inferior to what it was before its desolation...
Page 255 - The other was sir John Danvers, the younger brother and heir of the earl of Danby, who was a gentleman of the privy chamber to the king...
Page 256 - ... the saint-like behaviour of that blessed martyr, and his Christian courage and patience at his death, are all particulars so well known, and have been so much enlarged upon in a treatise peculiarly...
Page 73 - Westminster, forming a new catechism, and scheme of religion,) ever ventured to make any answer to it; nor is it indeed to be answered, but must remain to the world's end, as a monument of the learning, courage, and loyalty, of that excellent place, against the highest malice and tyranny that was ever exercised in or over any nation...
Page 270 - And so, after a long debate, though there was not a man who had not a value for him, and very few who had a particular malice or prejudice towards him, the...
Page 165 - Herbert the attorney general, who had never loved either of them, came to them, and congratulated their arrival, and told them " how much they had been wanted- and how much prince Rupert longed for their company.
Page 74 - It might reasonably be concluded that this wild and barbarous depopulation would even extirpate all that learning, religion, and loyalty which had so eminently flourished there; and that the succeeding...
Page 188 - Nottingham, and Lincoln, that they could not in a short time be restrained, and had leisure to fetch in all sorts of provisions for their support, and to make and renew such fortifications as might be necessary for their defence. From Nottingham there came sir John Digby, sir Hugh Cartwright, and a son and nephew of his, who had been good officers in the army, with many soldiers who had been under their command ; many other gentlemen of the three counties were present, and deserve to have their names...
Page 229 - God bless you, (and let us comfort you with that which is our own comfort, that though affliction may make us pass under the censures of men, yet we look upon it so, as, if it procure not by God's mercy to us a deliverance, it will to you a blessing,) rather to conquer your enemies by pardoning than punishing.

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