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lard in his “Lost Cause” says, “There could be no congeniality between the Puritan exiles who sought the cheerless shores of New England and the cavaliers who drank confusion to round-heads and regicides in their baronial halls of Virginia and the Carolinas.” But the foundation for the Order itself in the United States had been destroyed by the overthrow of the colonial charters in the republic. It had a right of existence and of representation however in Canada as a constitutional quantity. By the constitution on which the Dominion of Canada is founded, acknowledged by the capitulations of Montreal of 1760, by the order of creation of the Baronets of Nova Scotia, by the Quebec Act of 1774, by the Acts of Parliament in recognition of similar sovereignty of the colonial constitutions of 1778 (which contained the representation of colonial aristocracy), by the Loyalist Act in 1789—acts in themselves recognizing the irrefragibility of the constitution of the country and which no Canadian, or other parliament, has authority to undo, not even by a “British North American Act,” which is null, wherein it disagrees with the above pledges, and when enforced in an unconstitutional manner, absolves from allegiance the same as in 1776 a similar proceeding did. Through the officers the order opened communications with the British and Canadian governments. Dr. Stirling Ryerson, President of the U. E. Loyalist Division at Toronto, was deputed by the other U. E. Loyalist divisions to attend the Queen's Jubilee of 1897 as a representative and to present the address of the various bodies. In that address was a request that the decoration of the Loyalists, designed by Dr. Ryerson, and consisting of a bronze cross of the Victoria pattern, might be recorded with the precedence due it according to the law of 1789. He was referred to the Colonial Secretary, Mr. Chamberlain. To escape the dilemma of a refusal, Mr. Chamberlain said that it would be considered if recommended by the Canadian government. But the Canadian government, in the name of the King, in 1789 had already agreed to the recognition. However, Dr. Ryerson called to see the polite, political and liberal Premier, Laurier, and he with sauve diplomacy postponed action on the matter until a “more propitious season.”

During the administration of Lord Aberdeen, the Herald-Marshal, in the name of the Seigneurs of Canada, opened communication with that individual to know what arrangements had been made at the receptions at Ottawa, for the seigneurial precedence. Aberdeen did not deign a reply until he was rudely awakened by a command from his superior, the colonial secretary, to answer the demand of the Seigneurial Order. Then he replied stating that he had “referred the matter to the Canadian government.” Absurd,—to a set of politicians who exist solely as a franchise under a constitution, a part of which is the Seigneurial Order itself! Lord Minto, (who had united with these republican politicians and others of that ilk to insult the King's commander in Canada, Lord Dundonald, by signing his dismissal because he had done his duty contrary to the wishes of these politicians) seemed to be ignorant that there was anything in Canada but Himself and Them. But in the meantime the Aryan Order of the Empire in all its branches, perfecting its organization, founded on the constitution, supported by the legitimate prerogative of the crown, and by the vast majority of all the people of the Province of Quebec—who stand by the exact interpretation of the same constitution because it guarantees their religion, law, and language in exchange for their alegiance—is forming a physical force to employ in maintenance of its legal rights. And these rights, in this constitution, by the full strength of the Crown and Majesty of the Empire, by the very oath and mandium of the Sovereign, are bound to be sustained.

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Page. Introduction .... .......

PART I. Chapter I. Colonies under the Stuarts ................ 5 Chapter II. Virginia's Constitutional right exercised of

refusing to recognize the English Parliament's par-
ticipation in Royal Perogative-External dissensions .. 14
Bacon Rebellion of 1676.. ......................

PART II.
Chapter I. Maryland, Carolina, New York. The Mary-

land Lords of Manours .................. Chapter II. The South Carolina ..............

New York ............:................. 37
Middle Colonies ........................

PART III.
Chapter I. New England Colony and government; found-

ing of Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies .. .. 44 Chapter II. Beginning of Royalists in New England. King's Chapel. The Royal Charter.. ............. 53

PART IV.

UNION ERA.
Chapter I. Parliament usurps Crown functions in the

Provinces................................. 60 Chapter II. Consolidation on Continental Basis against

Parliament usurpation. Parties in the Colonies.. .... 67 Chapter III. Conspiracy and Hypocracy and Loyalty

and Honor armed together ..................... Chapter IV. Struggles in the Field .................... Chapter V. Declaration of Independence......

Second Declaration of Independence
Articles of Minute-Men ............

King a factor of the Charters .........
Chapter VI. The Climax ................

PART V.
Chapter I. Confederation of the Royalist Orders for Con-

stitutional Recognition ..........

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