The Myth of the Machine: Technics and human development

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Harcourt, Brace & World, 1967 - Technology and civilization - 342 pages
An in-depth look at the forces that have shaped modern technology since prehistoric times. Mumford criticizes the modern trend of technology, which emphasizes constant, unrestricted expansion, production, and replacement. He contends that these goals work against technical perfection, durability, social efficiency, and overall human satisfaction. Modern technology fails to produce lasting, quality products by using devices such as consumer credit, installment buying, non-functioning and defective designs, built-in fragility, and frequent superficial "fashion" changes. "Without constant enticement by advertising," he writes, "production would slow down and level off to normal replacement demand. Otherwise many products could reach a plateau of efficient design which would call for only minimal changes from year to year."

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Contents

PROLOGUE
3
THE MINDFULNESS OF MAN
14
IN THE DREAMTIME LONG AGO
48
Copyright

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