An Overland Journey Round the World: During the Years 1841 and 1842

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Lea and Blanchard, 1847 - California - 273 pages
 

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Page 204 - She was lively and animated, had sparkling, love-inspiring eyes, beautiful teeth, pleasing and expressive features, a fine form, and a thousand other charms; yet her manners were perfectly simple and artless.
Page 193 - We had been three long hours in this position, and still the mass of ice beneath us held together, when suddenly it was caught by the storm, and hurled against a large field of ice. The crash was terrific, and the mass beneath us was shattered into fragments. At that dreadful moment, when escape seemed impossible, the impulse of selfpreservation implanted in every living being saved us. Instinctively we all sprang at once on the sledges, and urged the dogs to their full speed. They flew across the...
Page 163 - Every day we put in soak twenty-five for each man, which, with us, made an hundred and fifty. There they lie forty-eight hours, when they are taken out, and rolled up, in wheel-barrows, and thrown into the vats. These vats contain brine, made very strong ; being seawater, with great quantities of salt thrown in. This pickles the hides, and in this they lie forty-eight hours ; the use of the sea-water, into which they are first put, being merely to soften and clean them. From these vats, they are...
Page 193 - Every moment huge masses of ice around us were dashed against each other, and broken into a thousand fragments. Our little party remained fast on our ice-island, which was tossed to and fro by the waves; we gazed in most painful inactivity on the wild conflict of the elements, expecting every moment to be swallowed up. We had been three long hours in this...
Page 217 - Angeles, which he did not visit, as 'the noted abode of the lowest drunkards and gamblers of the country. This den of thieves is situated, as one may expect from its being almost twice as populous as the two other pueblos taken together, in one of the loveliest and most fertile districts of Cal.
Page 38 - From the very brink of the river, there rises a gentle slope of greensward, crowned in many places with a plentiful growth of birch, poplar, beech, elm and oak. Is it too much for the eye of philanthropy to discern, through the vista of futurity, this noble stream, connecting, as it does, the fertile shores of two spacious lakes, with crowded steamboats on its bosom, and populous towns on its borders...
Page 225 - Strait and the equator. On this interesting subject we quote from Sir George Simpson's Overland Journey: ' The whole group appears to have been thrown up from the deep by volcanic action advancing from the northwest to the south-east, and increasing in force as it advanced; so that, while island rose after island, each grew at once in height and in breadth according to the intensity of the power that heaved it upwards from the waters.
Page 105 - Cree half-bred, of French origin, who appeared to have borrowed his dialect from both his parents; a North Briton, who understood only the Gaelic of his native hills; Canadians, who, of course, knew French ; and Sandwich Islanders, who jabbered a medley of Chinook, English, and their own vernacular jargon. Add to all this that the passengers were natives of England, Scotland, Russia, Canada, and The Hudson's Bay Company's territories ; and you have the prettiest congress of nations, the nicest confusion...
Page 128 - Some twenty or thirty years ago, there was a most wasteful destruction of the fur seal, when young and old, male and female, were indiscriminately knocked on the head. This imprudence, as any one might have expected, proved detrimental in two ways. The race was almost extirpated ; and the market was glutted to such a degree, at the rate for some time of two hundred thousand skins a year, that the prices did not even pay the expenses of carriage.
Page 255 - Upon this, a monstrous cuttle-fish, (sepia octopus, an animal of the moliisca-vermes tribe,) had just been placed fresh from the sea, and in all its life and vigour. The queen had taken it up with both hands, and brought its body to her mouth : and by a single application of her teeth, the black juices and blood, with which it was filled, gushed over her face and neck," while the long sucking arms of the fish, in the convulsive paroxysm of the operation...

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