A View of the History of Great Britain: During the Administration of Lord North, to the Second Session of the Fifteenth Parliament ... with Statements of the Public Expenditure in that Period, Page 2

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G. Wilkie, 1782 - Canada - 242 pages
 

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Page 196 - If then the removal of the causes of this spirit of American liberty be, for the greater part, or rather entirely, impracticable ; if the ideas of criminal process be inapplicable, or if applicable, are in the highest degree inexpedient ; what way yet remains ? No way is open, but the third and last — to comply with the American spirit as necessary ; or, if you please, to submit to it as a necessary evil.
Page 188 - To conclude, my lords, if the ministers thus persevere in misadvising and misleading the king, I will not say, that they can alienate the affections of his subjects from his crown ; but I will affirm, that they will make the crown not worth his wearing. I will not say that the king is betrayed ; but I will pronounce, that the kingdom is undone.
Page 156 - ... according to law and equity, and, as near as may be, agreeable to the laws of England...
Page 306 - I mean that for a limitation of the claims of the crown upon landed estates ; and this for the relief of the Roman Catholics. By the former he has emancipated property ; by the latter he has quieted conscience : and by both, he has taught that grand lesson to government and subject — no longer to regard each other as adverse parties.
Page 338 - ... but when that country professes the unnatural design not only of estranging herself from us, but of mortgaging herself and her resources to our enemies, the whole contest is changed ; and the question is, how far Great Britain may, by every means in her power, destroy or render useless a connection contrived for her ruin and for the aggrandizement of France.
Page 248 - Her fondness for conquest, as a warlike nation, her lust of dominion, as an ambitious one, and her...
Page 292 - Your efforts are for ever vain and impotent — doubly so from this mercenary aid on which you rely, for it irritates to an incurable resentment the minds of your enemies — to overrun them with the mercenary sons of rapine and plunder; devoting them and their possessions to the rapacity of hireling...
Page 291 - France, my lords, has insulted you ; she has encouraged and sustained America ; and whether America be wrong or right, the dignity of this country ought to spurn at the officious insult of French interference. The ministers and...
Page 111 - That all acquisitions made under the influence of a military force, or by treaty with foreign princes, do of right belong to the State.
Page 111 - State. 2. That to appropriate acquisitions so made to the private emolument of persons intrusted with any civil or military power of the State is illegal. 3. That very great sums of money, and other valuable property have been acquired in Bengal from Princes and others of that country, by persons...

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