Peaks, Passes, and Glaciers: A Series of Excursions by Members of the Alpine Club

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John Ball
Longman, Green, Longman, & Roberts, 1860 - Alps - 328 pages
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Page 22 - half-blinded by the smoke. But " come what come may, Time and the hour runs through the roughest day ;
Page 145 - was, no doubt, supremely ludicrous, but was not precisely the kind of spectacle for the contemplation of female friends, and they were repelled accordingly. It did not occur to me at the time, but I have my suspicions that those innocent damsels were privy to the catastrophe, and had of malice prepense unsettled the foundations of
Page 38 - halting, to the Tacul. Here a paltry piece of treacherous snow caused me more damage than all the dangers of the day. I was passing a rock, the snow beside it seemed firm, and I placed my bāton upon it, leaning trustfully upon the staff. Through the warmth of the rock, or some other cause, the
Page 39 - only say that the track which I pursued in 1858 bore no resemblance in point of difficulty to that which I followed in 1857. The reason probably is, that in my first expedition neither myself nor my companion knew anything of the route, and we were totally destitute of the adjuncts which guides commonly use in crossing the " Grand Col.
Page vi - The powers thus acquired have been chiefly directed to accomplishing the ascent of the highest summits, or effecting passes across the less accessible portions of the Alpine chain ; and within the last five years the highest peak of Monte Rosa, the Dom, the Great Combin, the Alleleinhorn, the Wetterhorn proper, and several other peaks never before scaled,
Page 36 - away, leaving the chasm spanned by a bridge of snow, the capacity of which to bear us was often a matter of delicate experiment. Over these bridges we stepped as lightly as possible : " Allez doucement ici,
Page 32 - the roar of an occasional avalanche, however, shooting down the flanks of Mont Mallet broke upon us with startling energy. I did not sleep till towards four o'clock in the morning, when I dozed, and dreamed, and mingled my actual condition with my dream.
Page 37 - the avalanches, but getting into ice more riven and dislocated. We were often utterly at a loss how to proceed. My companion made several attempts to regain the morning's track, preferring to risk the avalanches rather than be blocked and ditched up in an
Page vi - the Wetterhorn proper, and several other peaks never before scaled, have been successfully attacked by travellers, most of whose names will be found among the contributors to this volume. In the accidental intercourse of those who have been engaged in such expeditions, it has been perceived that the community of taste and feeling amongst those who in the
Page 37 - We proceeded, however, with the most steady watchfulness. When we arrived at a difficulty which seemed insuperable, we calmly inspected it, looking at it on all sides ; and though we had often to retrace our steps amid cliffs and chasms,

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