Prescribing Our Future: Ethical Challenges in Genetic Counseling

Front Cover
Dianne M. Bartels, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Arthur L. Caplan
Transaction Publishers - Medical - 186 pages

Genetic counselors translate the findings of scientific investigation into meaningful accounts that enable individuals and families to make decisions about their lives. This collection of original papers explores the history, values, and norms of that process, with some focus on the value of nondirectiveness in counseling practice. The contributors; examination of genetic counseling issues serves as a foundation from which to address other ethical, legal, and policy considerations in the expanding universe of clinical genetics.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Genetic Counseling Values That Have Mattered
3
The Training of Genetic Counselors Origins of a Psychosocial Model
15
The Workplace Ideology of Genetic Counselors
25
When Theory Meets Practice Challenges to the Field of Genetic Counseling
39
Social and Policy Issues in Genetic Counseling
55
Risk and the Ethics of Genetic Choice
57
Discrimination Issues and Genetic Screening
65
Role of Public Policy in Genetic Screening and Counseling
79
The Impact of the Human Genome Project for Genetic Counseling Services
97
The Evolution of Nondirectiveness in Genetic Counseling and Implications of the Human Genome Project
101
Objectivity Value Neutrality and Nondirectiveness in Genetic Counseling
119
Ethical Obligations of Genetic Counselors
131
Neutrality Is Not Morality The Ethics of Genetic Counseling
149
Appendix
167
National Society of Genetic Counselors Code of Ethics
169
References
173

Parables
89
Future Directions and Ethical Challenges in Genetic Counseling
95

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xi - A living organism at any moment in its life is the unique consequence of a developmental history that results from the interaction of and determination by internal and external forces. The external forces, what we usually think of as "environment," are themselves partly a consequence of the activities of the organism itself as it produces and consumes the conditions of its own existence. Organisms do not find the world in which they develop. They make it. Reciprocally, the internal forces are not...

Bibliographic information