Philoctetes

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 26, 1974 - History - 177 pages
The theme of Sophocles' Philoctetes is of lasting significance. It revolves round Neoptolemus' struggles with his conscience, and Philoctetes' strength in adversity and refusal to accept any compromise. Sophocles explores the relationship between the two central characters with powerful subtlety. The main emphasis in Professor Webster's commentary is on explaining the impact of the play through metre and language rather than on the examination and comparison of points of grammatical and syntactical usage. He deals with all the essential problems of the play at a level appropriate to the needs of students in the upper forms of schools and at university.
 

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Contents

PHILO CTETES
13
Commentary
66
Appendices
161
Indexes to the commentary
174
Copyright

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About the author (1974)

Sophocles was born around 496 B.C. in Colonus (near Athens), Greece. In 480, he was selected to lead the paean (choral chant to a god) celebrating the decisive Greek sea victory over the Persians at the Battle of Salamis. He served as a treasurer and general for Athens when it was expanding its empire and influence. He wrote approximately 123 plays including Ajax, Antigone, Oedipus Tyrannus, Trachiniae, Electra, Philoctetes, and Oedipus at Colonus. His last recorded act was to lead a chorus in public mourning for Euripides. He died in 406 B. C.

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