The Old Merchants of New York City, Volume 3

Front Cover
Thomas R. Knox & Company, 1885 - Business enterprises

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 132 - Mr. Harris entered upon the practice of law, and before his death in 1803 he had won an enviable reputation in his profession. He was regarded as one of the most promising young men in the State. The last of the trio, Mr. Holmes, resigned in 1798.
Page 5 - Queen Street, Next door, but one, to the Friends' Meeting House, Has for sale an assortment of Piano Fortes of the Newest Construction, made by the best makers in London, which he will sell at reasonable terms.
Page 227 - that a great deal of bad seawant, nasty rough things, imported from other places," was in circulation, while " the good splendid seawant, usually called Manhattan's seawant, was out of sight or exported, which must cause the ruin of the country!
Page 223 - An act relative to improvements touching the laying out of streets and roads in the city of New- York, and for other purposes," passed April 3, 1807; and the map or plan of said city is hereby altered accordingly.
Page 128 - Characters — beg leave to represent to your Excellencies— That we bear true allegiance to our Rightful Sovereign George the Third as well as warm affection to his sacred person Crown and Dignity.
Page 136 - The times of a few servants for sale on board of said ship. Also, Irish beef, in tierces, of the best quality; with a few firkins of butter. Apply to W. Neilson." Those "servants" were redemptionists. Some of our best families in this city came over to this country under these circumstances: For instance, the correspondent of William Neilson at Dublin, said to an Irishman who was poor, "Well, Michael, you wish to go to New York, but have no money. Now, I will...
Page 137 - Some of our best families in this city came over to this country under these circumstances. For instance, the correspondent of William Neilson at Dublin, said to an Irishman who was poor, " Well, Michael, you wish to go to New York, but have got no means. Now, I will advance you .100, and give you your passage and for your family also. " The result would be that Michael would accept, and work out his <100, whether it was for one, two, or three years, according to the terms of the agreement. As...
Page 23 - ... that I am old enough to be your father, and that a man with grown-up daughters ought not to think of making so young a girl his wife, but in spite of my being well over forty, my sympathies and affections are as keen as if I were twenty years younger, and if you will accept me, it shall be the study of my life to make you happy.

Bibliographic information