Prize essay. The Teacher's Manual: being an exposition of an efficient and economical system of education, suited to the wants of a free people

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Thomas H. Webb & Company, 1843 - Teaching - 263 pages

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Page 126 - Tis pleasant, through the loopholes of retreat, To peep at such a world ; to see the stir Of the great Babel, and not feel the crowd ; To hear the roar she sends through all her gates At a safe distance, where the dying sound Falls a soft murmur on the uninjured ear.
Page 257 - Lacedemonians, that honest people, more virtuous than polite, rose up all to a man, and with the greatest respect received him among them. The Athenians being suddenly touched with a sense of the Spartan virtue, and their own degeneracy, gave a thunder of applause ; and. the old man cried out, " The Athenians understand what is good, but the Lacedemonians practise it
Page 233 - But is it not some reproach upon the economy of Providence, that such a one, who is a mean, dirty fellow, should have amassed wealth enough to buy half a nation ? " Not in the least. He made himself a mean, dirty fellow for that very end. He has paid his health, his conscience, his liberty for it ; and will you envy him his bargain...
Page 257 - Athens, during a public representation of some play exhibited in honour of the commonwealth, that an old gentleman came too late for a place suitable to his age and quality. Many of the young gentlemen, who observed the difficulty and confusion he was in, made signs to him that they would accommodate him, if he came where they sat.
Page 57 - I shall detain you now no longer in the demonstration of what we should not do, but straight conduct you to a hillside, where I will point you out the right path of a virtuous and noble education ; laborious, indeed, at the first ascent, but else so smooth, so green, so full of goodly prospect, and melodious sounds on every side, that the harp of Orpheus was not more charming.
Page 9 - I call therefore a complete and generous education, that which fits a man to perform justly, skilfully, and magnanimously all the offices, both private and public, of peace and war.
Page 239 - Nothing but experience could evince the frequency of false information, or enable any man to conceive that so many groundless reports should be propagated, as every man of eminence may hear of himself. Some men relate what they think, as what they know; some men of confused memories and habitual inaccuracy, ascribe to one man what belongs to another ; and some talk on, without thought or care. A few men are sufficient to broach falsehoods, which are afterwards innocently diffused by successive relaters."*...
Page 94 - What is a man, If his chief good and market of his time Be but to sleep and feed? a beast, no more. Sure he that made us with such large discourse, Looking before and after, gave us not That capability and god-like reason To fust in us unus'd.
Page 109 - ... men have talked and conducted themselves in their intercourse with each other. 'There is a gentle, but perfectly irresistible coercion in a habit of reading well directed, over the whole tenor of a man's character and conduct, which is not the less effectual because it works insensibly, and because it is really the last thing he dreams of. It cannot, in short, be better summed up, than in the words of the Latin poet — " Emollit mores, nee sinit esse feros." It civilizes the conduct of men—...
Page 232 - In short, you must not attempt to enlarge your ideas, or polish your taste, or refine your sentiments ; but must keep on, in one beaten track, without turning aside, either to the right hand or to the left. ' But I cannot submit to drudgery like this. I feel a spirit above it.

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