International Handbook of Educational Policy

Front Cover
Nina Bascia, Alister Cumming, Amanda Datnow, Kenneth Leithwood, David Livingstone
Springer Science & Business Media, May 14, 2008 - Education - 1116 pages
Nina Bascia, Alister Cumming, Amanda Datnow, Kenneth Leithwood and David Livingstone This Handbook presents contemporary and emergent trends in educational policy research, in over ?fty chapters written by nearly ninety leading researchers from a number of countries. It is organized into ?ve broad sections which capture many of the current dominant educational policy foci and at the same time situate current understandings historically, in terms of both how they are conceptualized and in terms of past policy practice. The chapters themselves are empirically grounded, providing illustrations of the conceptual implications c- tained within them as well as allowing for comparisons across them. The se- re?exivity within chapters with respect to jurisdictional particularities and c- trasts allows readers to consider not only a range of approaches to policy analysis but also the ways in which policies and policy ideas play out in di?erent times and places. The sections move from a focus on prevailing policy tendencies through increasingly critical and ‘‘outsider’’ perspectives on policy. They address, in turn, the contemporary strategic emphasis on large-scale reform; substantive emphases at several levels – on leadership and governance, improving teacher quality and conceptualizing learning in various domains around the notion of literacies and concluding, ?nally, with a contrasting topic, workplace learning, which has had less policy attention and thus allows readers to consider both the advantages and disadvantages of learning and teaching under the bright gaze of policy.
 

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Contents

III
3
IV
18
V
53
VI
75
VII
100
VIII
115
IX
133
X
153
XXXI
579
XXXII
593
XXXIII
613
XXXIV
629
XXXV
645
XXXVI
661
XXXVII
676
XXXVIII
695

XI
173
XII
195
XIII
219
XIV
239
XV
260
XVI
281
XVII
295
XVIII
328
XIX
351
XX
371
XXI
392
XXII
421
XXIII
439
XXIV
457
XXV
473
XXVI
491
XXVII
507
XXVIII
527
XXIX
542
XXX
569
XXXIX
715
XL
735
XLI
748
XLII
763
XLIII
779
XLIV
792
XLV
815
XLVI
828
XLVII
847
XLVIII
865
XLIX
885
L
902
LI
923
LII
943
LIII
963
LIV
976
LV
997
LVI
1023
LVII
1043
LVIII
1064

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Page 41 - If an unfriendly foreign power had attempted to impose on America the mediocre educational performance that exists today, we might well have viewed it as an act of war.
Page 41 - States and the well-being of its people, the educational foundations of our society are presently being eroded by a rising tide of mediocrity that threatens our very future as a Nation and a people.
Page 35 - It was not that some of the ideas from the business world might not have been used to advantage in educational administration, but that the wholesale adoption of the basic values, as well as the techniques of the business-industrial world, was a serious mistake in an institution whose primary purpose was the education of children.

About the author (2008)

One of the most remarkable explorers of the nineteenth century, Livingstone sought first as a missionary and devout Christian to end the slave trade in Africa and then to locate the source of the Nile. In these attempts, he lost his wife, who caught a fever on an expedition in which she joined him. He discovered Victoria Falls and the lands between Nyasa and Tanganyika, encountering other hardships and tragedies in his double quest. He was apparently much beloved by Africans who knew him. He never abated in his efforts on their behalf. His association with Sir Henry Morton Stanley is well known. The latter had been sent to find him by an American newspaper when Livingstone was feared lost. The formal approach of Stanley's first remark on finding him in a remote African village, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume," amused the world, and the greeting became a byword. Stanley was with Livingstone in northern Tanganyika when the latter died. "Missionary Travels" (1857) is essentially the contemporary record of Livingstone's two journeys to northwestern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1851-1853.

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