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if called for, the original returns of election, in order that each house may judge of the correctness of the report of said board of canvassers.

Sec. 11. The Legislature, at its first session, shall elect such officers as may be ordered by this Constitution to be elected by that body, and, within four days after its organization, proceed to elect two Senators to the Congress of the United States. But no law passed by this Legislature shall take effect until signed by the Governor after his installation into office.

SEC. 12. The Senators and Representatives of the Congress of the United States elected by the Legislature and people of California, as herein directed, shall be furnished with certified copies of this Constitution, when ratified, which they shall lay before the Congress of the United States, requesting, in the name of the people of California, the admission of the State of California into the American Union.

SEC. 13. All officers of this ate, other than members of the Legislature, shall be installed into office on the fifteenth day of December next, or as soon thereafter as practicable.

SEC. 14. Until the Legislature shall divide the State into counties and senatorial and assembly districts, as directed by this Constitution, the following shall be the apportionment of the two houses of the Legislature, viz: The districts of San Diego and Los Angeles shall jointly elect two Senators; the districts of Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo shall jointly elect one Senator; the district of Monterey, one Senator; the district of San Jose, one Senator; the district of San Francisco, two Senators; the district of Sonoma, one Senator; the district of Sacramento, four Senators; and the district of San Joaquin, four Senators. And the district of San Diego shall elect one member of the Assembly; the district of Los Angeles, two members of Assembly; the district of Santa Barbara, two members of Assembly; the district of San Luis Obispo, one member of Assembly; the district of Monterey, two members of Assembly; the district of San Jose, three members of Assembly ; the district of San Francisco, five members of Assembly; the district of Sonoma, two members of Assembly; the district of Sacramento, nine members of Assembly; and the district of San Joaquin, nine members of Assembly.

SEC. 15. Until the Legislature shall otherwise direct, in accordance with the provisions of this Constitution, the salary of the Governor shall be ten thousand dollars per annum; and the salary of the Lieutenant-Governor shall be double the pay of a State Senator; and the pay of members of the Legislature shall be sixteen dollars per diem while in attendance, and sixteen dollars for every twenty miles traveled by the usual route from their residences to the place of holding the session of the Legislature, and in returning therefrom. And the Legislature shall fix the salaries of all officers other than those elected by the people at the first election.

SEC. 16. The limitation of the powers of the Legislature contained in Article VIII of this Constitution shall not extend to the first Legislature elected under the same, which is hereby authorized to negotiate for such amount as may be necessary to pay the expenses of the State government.

R. SEMPLE, President. WM. G. MARCY, Secretary.

Summary of Amendments Adopted by the Legislature and

Submitted to the Voters of California, with
Statement of Vote for and Against

Each Amendment,

1883-1914.

Article IX, Section 7.

(Statutes of 1883, page 365) Election November 4, 1884. Adopted. Yes, 143,017; No, 11,930.

Article XI, Section 19.

(Statutes of 1883, page 2) Election November 4, 1884. Adopted. Yes, 149,285; No, 7,363.

Article XIII, Section 9. (Statutes of 1884–85, extra session, page 12) Election November 4, 1884. Adopted. Yes, 128,371; No. 27,934.

Article XIII, Sections 1, 8, 10 and 11.

(Statutes of 1885, page 27) Proposing amendments requiring all properties (except railroads) not exempt to be taxed; excepting growing crops, school, and other public property, and specifying how vines and trees shall be assessed; relating to taxation of ships; to solvent credits, and requiring statements to county assessors by taxpayers.

Election November 2, 1886. Rejected. Yes, 9,992; No, 123,173.

Article XI, Section 8.

(Statutes of 1887, page 88) Election April 12, 1887. Adopted. Yes, 37,791 ; No, 34,156.

Article VI, Sections 2 and 3.

(Statutes of 1887, page 96) Proposing an amendment specifying number of Supreme Court judges, and relating to vacancy in office of Chief Justice, terms of office, etc.

Election April 12, 1887. Rejected. Yes, 29,349; No, 41,367.

Article VI, Sections 2 and 3.

(Statutes of 1887, page 242) Proposing an amendment relative to judiciary, specifying number of justices of Supreme Court, terms of office, and manner of election of Supreme Justice.

Election April 12, 1887. Rejected. Yes, 27,659; No, 43,005.

Article XI, Section 8.

(Statutes of 1889, page 340) Election November 4, 1890. Adopted. Yes, 96,342; No, 3,275.

Article IV, Section 2.

(Statutes of 1891, page 3) Proposing an amendment relating to sessions of the Legislature, compensation of members and legislative procedure.

Election November 8, 1892. Rejected. Yes, 36,442; No, 153,831.

Article V, Sections 15 and 19.

(Statutes of 1891, page 528) Proposing an amendment relating to election of Lieutenant Governor; duties ; vacancy in office of; providing for salary of Governor, Lieutenant Governor, Secretary of State, Controller, Treasurer, Attorney General, Surveyor General, etc.

Election November 8, 1892. Rejected. Yes, 43,456; No, 128,743.

Article XI, Section 8.

(Statutes of 1891, page 533) Election November 8, 1892. Adopted. Yes, 114,617; No, 42,076.

Article IV, Section 34.

(Statutes of 1891, page 531) Proposing an amendment requiring that no bill (except general appropriation and deficiency bills) shall contain more than one appropriation, and for a single purpose; also as to deficiency bill; action on same by the Governor; incurring of deficiency by State officers, etc.

Election November 8, 1892. Rejected. Yes, 69,286; No, 87,708.

Article XI, Section 18.

(Statutes of 1891, page 523) Election November 8, 1892. Adopted. Yes, 108,942; No, 59,548.

16-30224

Article XIII, Section 1234.

(Statutes of 1893, page 623) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 147,002; No, 48,153.

Article II, Section 1.

(Statutes of 1893, page 543) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 170,113; No, 32,281.

Article 1, Section 17.

(Statutes of 1893, page 624) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 119,309; No, 56,805.

Article IX, Section 7.

(Statutes of 1893, page 659) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 98,676; No, 77,295.

Article XIII, Section 9.

(Statutes of 1893, page 627) Proposing an amendment relative to the election of a State board of equalization; to county boards of equalization; to duties of each such board, and the election of members to each.

Election November 6, 1894. Rejected. Yes, 86,777; No, 88,605.

Article XI, Section 3.

(Statutes of 1893, page 617) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 140,713; No, 44,824.

Article XIII, Section 1.

(Statutes of 1893, page 658) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 135,741; No, 46,338.

Article XI, Section 7.

(Statutes of 1893, page 625) Election November 6, 1894. Adopted. Yes, 106,768; No, 62,425.

Article IV, Section 23.

(Statutes of 1893, page 660) Proposing an amendment relative to compensation, mileage and contingent expenses members of Legislature.

Election November 6, 1894. Rejected. Yes, 45,675; No, 146,680.

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