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Printed for the use of the Committee on Labor and Public Welfare

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON : 1967

For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $2.00

COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE

LISTER HILL, Alabama, Chairman WAYNE MORSE, Oregon

JACOB K. JAVITS, New York RALPH YARBOROUGH, Texas

WINSTON L. PROUTY, Vermont JOSEPH S. CLARK, Pennsylvania

PETER H. DOMINICK, Colorado JENNINGS RANDOLPH, West Virginia GEORGE MURPHY, California HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, JR., New Jersey PAUL J. FANNIN, Arizona CLAIBORNE PELL, Rhode Island

ROBERT P. GRIFFIN, Michigan
EDWARD M. KENNEDY, Massachusetts
GAYLORD NELSON, Wisconsin
ROBERT F. KENNEDY, New York

STEWART E. MCCLURE, Chief Clerk
JOHN S. FORSYTHE, General Counsel
EUGENE MITTELMAN, Minority Counsel

SUBCOMMITTEE ON LABOR

RALPH YARBOROUGH, Texas, Chairman WAYNE MORSE, Oregon

JACOB K. JAVITS, New York JENNINGS RANDOLPH, West Virginia WINSTON L. PROUTY, Vermont CLAIBORNE PELL, Rhode Island

PAUL J. FANNIN, Arizona GAYLORD NELSON, Wisconsin

ROBERT P. GRIFFIN, Michigan
ROBERT F. KENNEDY, New York
HARRISON A. WILLIAMS, JR., New Jersey

ROBERT O. HARRIS, Counsel
GENE E. GODLEY, Professional Staff Member
PETER C. BENEDICT, Minority Labor Counsel

II

INTRODUCTION

After the settlement of the airlines dispute last summer, I asked Dr. James R. Wason, specialist in labor economics and relations in the Economics Division of the Legislative Reference Service of the Library of Congress, to prepare a report on the experience of Congress with intervention in labor-management disputes and emergency disputes legislation, especially in peacetime. Dr. Wason is engaged in writing this report. When finished, his account should contribute materially to our understanding of this important and complex aspect of congressional history: However

, this year we have already had critically important disputes between labor and management arise in the trucking and the railroad industries (both critical transportation industries), disputes which are not yet resolved. Other unresolved disputes loom in other industries. The Congress has already been asked to intervene in the railroad dispute. Under the circumstances, it seems almost certain that Members of the Congress will be called upon to act in this complex and sensitive field in which, as we discovered last summer, so few of us are expert.

Accordingly, to fill an immediate need, I asked Dr. Wason to put aside the preparation of the history long enough to prepare, for immediate publication, a documentary history of what Congress has done in past labor-management disputes that exhausted existing machinery for settling labor disputes.

This report is that documentary history. The materials selected and the comments introducing them are the responsibility of Dr. Wason. I believe that, as he has said, he has tried to be impartial in making the selections. He has included practically every point of view and information on nearly every method of approach to labor-management dispute emergencies which spill over into the field of Federal Government intervention. He has also provided an account of the major actions by Congress and the Presidents in such emergencies since 1916. All of the major pieces of legislation and key court decisions are reproduced

I think all Members of the Congress will find this report useful, regardless of the approach to the solution of our labor-management relations problems they may prefer.

RALPH YARBOROUGH, Chairman, Subcommittee on Labor.

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