Hesperides, Or, Works Both Human and Divine

Front Cover
Bohn, 1852 - 258 pages
 

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Contents

To the same
38
To Joseph Lord Bishop of Exeter
39
Lyric for Legacies
40
AMATORY ODES
41
A Hymn to Venus and Cupid
42
The Shower of Blossoms
43
The Dream
44
Upon Julias Hair in a Golden Net
45
The Nightpiece
46
The Bleeding Hand or the Sprig of Eglantine given to a Maid
47
The Changes to Corinna an expostulation
48
To his Mistress objecting to him neither toying or
49
To Silvia to wed
50
The Parliament of Roses To Julia
51
To Jealousy
52
To Sappho
53
Upon Julias Riband
54
The Vision To Electra
55
The Eye
56
Hymn to the Graces
57
The Rose Song
58
To Julia in her dawn or daybreak
59
No Loathsomeness in Love
60
Ixxiii Love Perfumes all Parts
61
To Dianeme
62
Ixxvi A Hymn to Love
63
To the Lark
64
ixxix Upon the Rose in Julias Bosom
65
Ixxxii To Anthea who may command him any thing
68
To a Gentlewoman objecting to him his grey hairs
68
The Cruel Maid
68
Ixxxvi A ring presented to Julia
69
To the Western Wind
70
1xxxix The suspicion upon his overmuch familiarity with a Gentlewoman
71
Upon Love
72
xcii To Groves
73
To the Virgins to make much of time
74
xcy Impossibilities To my Friend
75
To the Maids to walk abroad
76
Upon Julias Sweat
77
The Primrose
78
Kissing Usury
79
To Carnations A Song
80
To Dianeme
81
To Anthea
82
Upon a Delaying Lady
83
What kind of Mistress he would have
84
Upon the loss of his Mistress
85
To Electra
86
Loves play at push pin
87
The Kiss A Dialogue
88
Lips Tongueless
89
The Apron of Flowers
90
The Frozen Heart
91
To Dianeme
92
To his Mistress
93
No spouse but a sister
94
To his Mistress
95
To Julia
95
The Wounded Heart
96
To Dews A Song
97
The Lawn
98
To Julia
99
To all young men that love
100
A meditation for his Mistress
101
His Recantation
102
The lily in a crystal
103
The lily in a crystal
105
His misery in a mistress
106
Upon Cupid
107
Upon a black twist rounding the arm of
108
Love lightly pleased
114
Upon Irene
120
How his soul came ensnared
124
Upon Love
125
The Rainbow or curious Covenant
126
ChopCherry
127
An Hymn to Cupid
128
Upon Mistress Susanna Southwell Her cheeks
129
The Head ache
130
His parting from Mrs Dorothy Keneday
131
The Scarfire
133
On Julias picture
134
Upon Himself
135
How Pansies or Heartsease came first 1 36
136
To Mistress Amy Potter
137
Upon Himself ccxxx To Sycamores
138
Clothes do but cheat and cozen us
139
A Caution
140
A defence of Women
141
A vow to Venus
142
To his Girls who would have him sportful
143
A Sonnet of Perilla
144
Upon Lucia dabbled in the dew
145
Why flowers change colour
146
To Myrrha hard hearted
147
The Parting Verse or charge to his supposed wife when he travelled
148
ANACREONTIC AND BACCHANALIAN
151
A short Hymn to Venus
152
Lyric to Mirth
153
To Bianca to bless him
154
To Julia
155
A Bacchanalian Verse To Ben Jonson
156
To Sir Clipseby Crew
157
To Phillis to love and live with him
158
A Kiss
159
To live merrily and to trust to good verses
160
cclxxv On Himself
162
To Bacchus A Canticle
163
To Sappho
164
To Music
165
Best to be Merry
166
A Frolic
167
A Bacchanalian Verse
168
Courage Cooled
169
Anacreontic
170
The cheat of Cupid or the ungentle guest
172
To M Kellam
178
The Welcome to Sack
180
An end decreed
194
EPITHALAMIUM
195
The Tithe To the Bride
196
The Entertainment or Porch Verse at the Mar riage of Mr Henry Northly and the most witty Mrs Lettice Yard
197
The GoodNight or Blessing
198
Bashfulness 142 1
199
Connubii Flores or the Wellwishes at Weddings
204
A Nuptial Verse to Mistress Elizabeth Lee now Lady Tracy
207
A Nuptial Song or Epithalamy on Sir Clipseby Crew and his Lady
208
Life is the Bodys Light
213
To his Muse 18
18
The Meadow Verse or Anniversary of Mrs Bridget
24
A Bucolic or discourse of Neatherds 30
30
How Violets came blue 37
37
To Cherry blossoms 45
45
To the King and Queen 186
47
To Blossoms
55
A Pastoral sung to the King
61
To Violets
75
The Beggar to Mab the Fairy Queen
81
xlix
87
Ceremony upon Candlemas Eve 92
92
liv
93
TwelfthNight or King and Queen 94
94
cxxill Mean things overcome Mighty
115
Blame 121
121
92
124
St Distaffs day or the morrow after Twelfthday 95
127
Izv The Maypole 96
128
Charms 97
129
98
130
The Old Wives Prayer 99
131
Cruelty 132
132
Strength to support sovereignty 133
133
Advice the best Actor 134
134
The Mean 185
135
100
142
Distrust 143
143
Ixxix Upon a Virgin 102
144
Ixxx His own Epitaph 103
145
Ixxxii Upon Prew his Maid 104
146
The Poets good wishes for the most hopeful and handsome Prince the Duke of York
149
To the Rt Hon Mildmay Earl of Westmoreland 150
150
Upon a Child
151
Adversity
152
Ixxxv Upon a Virgin 105
157
baxxviii Upon a Maid 106
158
cvi
164
To the King upon his coming into the West 165
165
To his dear Valentine Mrs Margaret Falconbridge 166
166
To the most comely and proper M Eliazbeth Finch 157
167
To Sir John Berkley Governor of Exeter 168
168
Upon M William Lawes the rare musician 169
169
To M Leonard Willan his Peculiar Friend 170
170
Writing
171
The School or Pearl of Putney the mistress of all singular manners Mrs Portman 172
172
To the King upon his welcome to Hampton Court 173
173
Fame makes us forward
174
To M H Lawes the Composer of his Lyrics 17
175
To his brotherinlaw Master John Wingfield 176
176
To his peculiar friend M Jo Wicks 177
177
To his friend Master J Jincks 178
178
A Psalm or Hymn to the Graces 180
180
120
182
His Loss 122
184
Penitence 123
185
Consultation 124
186
clxxxviü Anger 125
187
His Prayer to Ben Jonson 188
188
To his Verses 189
189
Ill Government 128
190
His Poetry his Pillar 191
191
Griefs 129
192
The Curse A Song
193
сҳсу Want 126
194
His Alms 195
195
A Hymn to Clipseby Crew 196
196
cercxliii A Dirge upon the death of Lord Bernard Stuart 197
197
Upon his departure hence 198
198
Leprosy in clothes 199
199
Laws
200
His Lachrymæ or mirth turned to mourning 201
201
On Himself 201
202
A good Husband 203
203
Change common to all 204
204
His Wish to Privacy 205
205
An Hymn to the Muses 206
206
His Grace or private wealth 208
207
Obedience in subjects 136
208
The Invitation 209
209
Proof to no purpose 210
210
The smell of the Sacrifice 211
211
A Ternarie of Littleseupon a pipkin of jelly
212
Poets
213
Foolishness 145
217
After AutumnWinter 146
218
ENCOMIASTIC VERSES 11
219
To his Muse 148
220
di
221
His Change
227
The Mad Maids Song
228
A Vow to Mars
229
Liberty
230
Upon Prudence Baldwin her sickness
231
Matins or Morning Prayer
232
His content in the Country
233
His Windingsheet
234
cecl To the Queen 153
235
To his Peculiar Friend Sir Edward Fish Knight 154
236
To the Right Gracious Prince Lodwiek Duke of Richmond and Lenox 155
237
To his Kinsman Sir Thomas Soame 155
238
Long lookd for comes at last
239
116
240
To Mistress Katharine Bradshaw 157
To the most Learned Antiquary M John Selden 158
To the King to cure the evil 160
To the most virtuous Mistress Pot 161
To Doctor Alabaster 162
cccxxiii To his Worthy Kinsman Mr Stephen Soame 163

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Page 150 - You haste away so soon; As yet the early-rising Sun Has not attain'd his noon. Stay, stay Until the hasting day Has run But to the even-song; And, having pray'd together, we Will go with you along. We have short time to stay, as you, We have as short a Spring ; As quick a growth to meet decay As you, or any thing. We die, As your hours do, and dry Away Like to the Summer's rain ; Or as the pearls of morning's dew, Ne'er to be found again.
Page 52 - Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying, And this same flower that smiles to-day, Tomorrow will be dying. The glorious lamp of heaven, the sun, The higher he's a-getting, The sooner will his race be run, And nearer he's to setting. That age is best which is the first, When youth and blood are warmer; 10 But being spent, the worse, and worst Times still succeed the former.
Page 125 - Come, let us go while we are in our prime; And take the harmless folly of the time. We shall grow old apace, and die Before we know our liberty. Our life is short, and our days run As fast away as does the sun...
Page 29 - Good morning to this primrose too ; Good morrow to each maid ; That will with flowers the tomb bestrew Wherein my Love is laid. Ah ! woe is me, woe, woe is me, Alack and well-a-day ! For pity, sir, find out that bee, Which bore my Love away.
Page 38 - Ribbons to flow confusedly: A winning wave, deserving note, In the tempestuous petticoat: A careless shoe-string, in whose tie I see a wild civility: Do more bewitch me than when art Is too precise in every part.
Page 52 - TO THE VIRGINS, TO MAKE MUCH OF TIME Gather ye rose-buds while ye may: Old Time is still a- flying; And this same flower that smiles to-day, To-morrow will be dying.
Page 35 - WINDING-SHEET. COME thou, who art the wine and wit Of all I've writ: The grace, the glory, and the best Piece of the rest. Thou art of what I did intend The all and end ; And what was made, was made to meet Thee, thee, my sheet.
Page 147 - Teemed her refreshing dew? Alas, you have not known that shower That mars a flower; Nor felt the unkind Breath of a blasting wind; Nor are ye worn with years;
Page 91 - Ah Ben! Say how or when Shall we, thy guests, Meet at those lyric feasts, Made at the Sun, The Dog, the Triple Tun ; Where we such clusters had, As made us nobly wild, not mad ? And yet each verse of thine Out-did the meat, out-did the frolic wine. My Ben ! Or come again, Or send to us Thy wit's great overplus; But teach us yet Wisely to husband it, Lest we that talent spend ; And having once brought to an end That precious stock, — the store Of such a wit the world should have no more.
Page 14 - I write of Hell ; I sing, and ever shall, Of Heaven, and hope to have it after all.) 2.

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