Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society Held at Philadelphia for Promoting Useful Knowledge, Volume 18

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Page 76 - But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear...
Page 352 - The eye of man hath not heard, the ear of man hath not seen; man's hand is not able to taste, his tongue to conceive, nor his heart to report, what my dream was.
Page 227 - And God made the beast of the earth after his kind, and cattle after their kind, and every thing that creepeth upon the earth after his kind: and God saw that it was good.
Page 89 - It is inconceivable, that inanimate brute matter should, without the mediation of something else, which is not material, operate upon, and affect other matter without mutual contact; as it must do, if gravitation, in the sense of Epicurus, be essential and inherent in it.
Page 89 - This most beautiful system of the sun, planets, and comets, could only proceed from the counsel and dominion of an intelligent and powerful Being.
Page 442 - The stone which the builders refused is become the head-stone of the corner. This is the Lord's doing; it is marvellous in our eyes.
Page 89 - He that planted the ear, shall he not hear? he that formed the eye, shall he not see?
Page 231 - These masses should assume a spheroidical form, with a rotatory motion in the direction of that of their revolution, because their inferior particles have a less real velocity than the superior ; they have therefore constituted so many planets in a state of vapour.
Page 91 - ... any conceivable expansion of the powers we now possess. We may think over the subject again and again, but it eludes all intellectual presentation. The origin of the material universe is equally inscrutable.
Page 231 - But if one of them was sufficiently powerful to unite successively by its attraction all the others about its centre, the ring of vapours would be changed into one sole spheroidical mass, circulating about the Sun, with a motion of rotation in the same direction with that of revolution.

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