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Nor prayer is made on earth alone;

The Holy Spirit pleads ;
And Jesus on th' eternal throne,

For sinners intercedes.
O ! Thou, by whom we come to God,

The Life, the Truth, the Way!
The path of prayer thyself hast trod;

Lord, teach us how to pray. Montgomery.

The following verse was literally translated from the Persian by Sir William Jones :

“On Parent knees, a naked new-born child,
Weeping thou sat'st, whilst all around thee smil'd,
So live, that, sinking in thy last long sleep,
Calm thou may’st smile, when all around thee weep.'

CAN GYNTAF HORACE.
Amrywiaeth tueddiadan dynion, a dewisiad y Bardd.

O MÆCENAS, hil brenhinoedd,
(Ti yw'm noddwr, ti yw'm clod,)
Hoffder un yw gyrru cerbyd
Ar Olympus heibio'r nod,
Ar olwynion wedi poethi,
’Nyhanol cwmmwl mawro lwch,
A'i ddyrchafu at y duwiau,
Carno moliant arno'n drwch.
Hoffder arall yw ei godi
Gan y werin yu ddi-wâd,
Dair neu bedair gwaith olynol,
I oruchaf swyddau 'r wlad :
Arall cilwaith a foddlonir,
Os ei 'sgubor fydd yn llawn
O gynnyrchion pennaf Libya
Gwlad y gwenith goreu a gawn.
Byth nis gellit ddenu 'r ffermwr
Hoff o redig tir ei dad,
Ped addewit olud Asia,
1 ymadaw 'mhell o'i wlad,

Prynn ullong o goedydd Cyprus,
Mynd yn forwr calon o'r,
Ymladd ar ororau Myrtos
A chinddeiriog, donnau 'r môr.
Tra mac gwyntoedd crifion Affrig
Yn cynhyrfu 'r môr i gyd,
Mae 'r masnachor prudd yn canmol
Hoff dawelwch cartref clyd ;
Ond pan ddychwel hyfryd hinon,
Taccla’i lestri megis cynt,-
Arswyd tlodi leinw'i fynwes,
Ail-gychwyna ar ei hynt.
Y mae arall, nid yw 'n poesio
Treulio deryn mawr o 'r dydd,
I lymmeitian gwlybwr hyfryd
Gwinwydd Massig-goreu sudd,
Gorwedd weithiau yn y goedwig,
A'i ælodan oll ar led,
Aphryd arall wrth y cornant,
Dros y graiad clir å red.
Hoffa llawer drost y gwersyll,
Swn y tabwrdd, sain y cyrn,
(Gofid mamman) rhyfel creulon,
Àbod yn yr ymgyrch chwyrn.
Ond

yr

heliwr, yn yr oerfel, Sy'n anghofio 'i wraig a'i fwyd, Os ei gwn a welant garw, Neu os baedd a dyrr ei rwyd. Minnau, amgylchned eiddew Fy arleisian-gwobrwy dysg, Addurn gwyrddlas anfarwolionGweler finpan yn eu mysg ; Cysgod hyfryd gelltydd oerion, Llamsach bywiog duwiau 'r coed, A'm didola o blyth dynionDyma 'r bywyd goreu erioed. Dim mi i ond cyfeillachu Dan y cudd a'r Awen fwyn, Ilais y bib a sain y delyn Yn fy nghylch a 'n peraidd swyn ;

Cael fy nghyfrif gyda Beirddiau,
Awdwyr hoff ganiadau per,
Dyna ddigon o ddedwyddwch,

Cwyd fy nghoryn c 'wch a 'r ser.
Llanymddyfri.

Cuficithydd.

PROFESSOR PORSON. PROFESSOR PORSon observing that he could pun upon any words, was told that he could not pun on the three Latin Gerunds di, do, dum, when he gave the following answer

“ When Dido found Æneas would not come,

She mourned in silence and was di, do, dum,"

73

DR. COLE. When Dr. Cole, who was a leading man and zealous Roman Catholic, in the time of Mary, was made the bearer of a commission from that sovereign (aptly termed “The Bloody,") for the purpose of having enacted the same fatal tragedy among her Protestant subjects in Ireland, as had already been done at home in Smithfield, he made during the progress of the business some little stay at Chester. Here he was waited upon by the Mayor of that city ; in the course of the conversation which passed between them, the Doctor was so full of his commission, that he could not forbear as we say, 'to let the cat out of the bag.”

“ I have that with me, said he, producing a little box from his portmanteau, “which will lash the heretics of Ireland.” His hostess, a Mrs. Edmunds, had the good luck to overhear this ; and being more than half a heretic herself, and having a brother of that profession in Dublin, she became much troubled ; and taking her opportunity whilst the Doctor was gone down to compliment his worship the Mayor to the door, she stepped into the dean's apartment, took out the commission, and put a pack of cards into the box in its room. The Doctor having completed his civilities, returns to his chamber, and puts up his box without the least suspicion of what had bappened. Soon after this he set sail for Dublin, where he arrived, Dec. 7, 1558. Being introduced to Lord Fitzwalter (the Lord Lieutenant), and the Privy Council, he began with a speech in form, to set forth the nature of his business, and then delivered in his box with due ceremony. “ What have we here ?” says his lordship, at the

wning, “this is nothing but a pack of cards.” It is not easy to conceive the Doctor's feelings at the ridiculous figure he now made. He could only say that a commission he certainly had, but who had played him the trick he could not

" Why, then, Mr. Dean," says his lordship, "you have nothing to do; but to return to London again, and get your commission renewed, whilst we in the meantime shuffle your cards.” This sarcastic advice the Doctor, no doubt, with infinite chagrin, was obliged to take, though at so disagreeable a season of the year; but whilst all this was about, meeting with contrary winds, and other vexatious delays, behold, the Queen died, and so the business came all to nothing. It is said, moreover, that Queen Elizabeth was so well pleased with this story that she allowed Mrs. Edmunds £40 a year during her life for this seasonable and important piece of dexterity.

INSTINCT OF LIONS. The Author of the "Economy of Nature," gives a wonderful proof of the instinct of lions. In those arid tracts, where rivers and fountains are denied, the lion lives in a perpetual fever. There the pelican makes her nest; and in order to cool her young ones, and accustom them to an element they are afterwards to be conversant in, brings from afar, in her great gular pouch, sufficient water to fill the nest. The Lion and other wild beasts approach and quench their thirst; yet never injure the unfledged birds, as if conscious that their destruction would immediately put an end to those grateful supplies.

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SAGACITY OF DOGS. A short time back, a gentleman resident in the upper part of Carnarvonshire, received an invitation from a gentleman residing in Middlewich, to spend a month with him. The gentleman accepted the invitation, and took with him favourite greyhound. The next day after their arrival, a inastiff, belonging to the inviter, attacked the greyhound, and gave him a good

drubbing. The greyhound immediately took to his heels, and fed home to Carnarvonshire, a distance of about 90 miles, and the family there were much surprised to see the dog return without his master. Next morning the greyhound and a remarkably strong bull-dog, belonging to the same gentleman, disappeared, and no trace could be found of either of them until a few days afterwards, when a letter was received from the Welsh gentleman, saying, his bull-dog and greyhound had arrived at his host's house in Cheshire, and both had attacked the mastiff belonging to his friend and had destroyed him before they could be separated.

A GOOD REASON. “Why do you drive such a pitiful looking carcase as that for? Why don't you put a good heavy coat of flesh on him ?" asked John Van Buren of an Irish carter, about his horse. “A heavy coat of flesh! mavourneen. Be all the blessed powers, now, when the poor crathur can scarce carry the little Hesh there is on him!”

INN HOSPITALITY. Ar an inn at the new passage, near Bristol, some person has written with a diamond on the glass of the window the following lines very legibly and in a conspicuous place. The lines are Shenstone's :

“ Whoe'er has travellid life's dull round,

Whate'er his stages may have been,
Will sigh to think he oft has found

His warmest welcome at an inn."

Some wag, on the next pane, scribbled the following reply :

“ Not much welcome will be found

By a guest without a pound;
The welcome therefore at an inn,
Depends entirely on your tin."

age of

THRice the age of a dog is that of a horse ; thrice the a horse is that of a man; thrice the age of a man is that of a deer.

STATISTICS. The Hindoo mythology contains no less than 330,000,000 of deities.

A SINGLE female housefly produces in one season, 20,080,320 eggs.

The average weight of the brain of a man is three pounds and a half; that of a woman two pounds eleven ounces.

ELEPHANTS live for 200, 300, and even 400 years.

A SALMON is one of the most productive of fishes ; one of them has been found with nearly 10,000,000 eggs.

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