Dental Perspectives on Human Evolution: State of the Art Research in Dental Paleoanthropology

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Shara E. Bailey, Jean-Jacques Hublin
Springer Science & Business Media, Aug 20, 2007 - Social Science - 412 pages
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S. E. BAILEY Department of Human Evolution Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Deutscher Platz 6 D-04103 Leipzig, Germany and Center for the Study of Human Origins, Department of Anthropology, New York University, 25 Waverly Place New York, NY 10003, USA sbailey@nyu. edu J. -J. HUBLIN Department of Human Evolution Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Deutscher Platz 6 D-04103 Leipzig, Germany hublin@eva. mpg. de When faced with choosing a topic to as teeth represent, by far, the most abundant be the focus of the first symposium material documenting different species of in Human Evolution at the Max Planck extinct non-human primates and hominins. As Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in such, much of what we know about non- Leipzig, a paleoanthropological perspective human primate and hominin evolution is based of dental anthropology was a natural choice. on teeth. Teeth make up a disproportionate number Teeth have been a focus of interest for of the fossils discovered. They represent physical anthropologists over many gen- strongly mineralized organs of compact shape, ations. Teeth provide a multitude of which allow better preservation in geological information about humans – including deposits and archaeological sites than any cultural treatment, pathology, morphological other part of the skeleton. As a result, variation, and development. The presence of since the discoveries of the first fossils of culturally induced wear (toothpick grooves, extinct species, vertebrate paleontology has for example) reveals something about what been built primarily on analyses of teeth.
 

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Contents

PART I DENTAL EVOLUTION AND DENTAL MORPHOLOGY
2
1 Introduction
3
2 Patterns of molar variation in great apes and theirimplications for hominin taxonomy
9
The case of Paranthropus
33
4 Maxillary molars cusp morphology of South Africanaustralopithecines
53
Preliminary approach to some dental characters of interestfor phylogenetic studies
65
A newmethodology
81
Methodological aspects of threedimensional data collection
102
PART III DENTAL DEVELOPMENT
228
1 Introduction
231
Quantitative genetic analysesof size variation along the dental arcade
236
An EVODEVO perspective
247
4 Dental calcification stages of the permanentM1 and M2 in US children of AfricanAmericanand EuropeanAmerican ancestry born in the 1990s
262
A new tool for studying evolutionary trends in the dentition
275
PART IV DENTITION AND DIET
289
1 Introduction
291

A quantitativevolumetric analysis and 3D reconstruction of coronal enameland dentin
117
PART II DENTAL MICROSTRUCTURE AND LIFE HISTORY
137
1 Introduction
138
The case of the extinct Malagasylemur Megaladapis
147
3 Histological study of an upper incisor and molar of a bonoboPan paniscus individual
163
4 New perspectives on chimpanzee and humanmolar crown development
177
5 Portable confocal scanning optical microscopyof Australopithecus africanus enamel structure
193
6 Imbricational enamel formation in Neandertalsand recent modern humans
211
2 An evaluation of changes in strontiumcalcium ratiosacross the neonatal line in human deciduous teeth
303
3 Dental topography and human evolution with commentson the diets of Australopithecus africanus and Paranthropus
320
Cautionsand possibilities
345
A case study
369
6 3D interferometric microscopy applied to the study of buccalenamel microwear
391
Index
405
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About the author (2007)

Shara Bailey: Shara Bailey is an Assistant Professor at New York University and a member of the Center for the study of Human Origins.  Her past appointments include Research Scientist at the Max Planck Insitutue for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig (Germany) and Post-Doctoral Researcher at The George Washington University, Washington DC.  She completed her PhD in Biolgoical Anthropology at Arizona State University, Tempe in 2002. Dr. Bailey's primary reserach interest is in addressing paleoanthropological questions from a dental perspective.  The major focus of her research has been Middle to Late Pleistocene hominns and modern human origins, but her research interests include early hominin and primate evolution as well.

Jean-Jacques Hublin: Jean-Jacques Hublin, Ph.D., is currently a Professor at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig (Germany), where he also serves as the Director of the Department of Human Evolution. Initially his research focuses on the origin and evolution of Neanderthals and he has proposed an accretion model for the emergence of the Neandertal lineage that roots it in time in the middle of the middle Pleistocene. He also worked on the processes associated with the emergence of Homo sapiens and on the interactions between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans in Europe. He developed the use of medical and virtual imaging in the reconstruction and study of fossil hominids and paid attention to the growth and development issues. He has led field operations in North Africa, Spain and France. In addition to his scientific papers, he has regularly published popular books (with translations in English, Italian, Spanish and Chinese) and articles on the subjects of Neanderthal and early modern human evolution. Significant past research and teaching appointments include: Researcher, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (1981-2000), Visiting Professor, University of California at Berkeley (1992), Harvard University (1997) and Stanford University (1999), Elected member of the French National Committee of Scientific Research (1991-2000), Professor at the University of Bordeaux (2000-2004), and Deputy Director for Anthropology, Prehistory and Paleo-environmental Sciences, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (2000-2003).

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