The life of Samuel Johnson ... together with The journal of a tour to the Hebrides. New eds. with notes and appendices by A. Napier. [Followed by] Johnsoniana, ed. by R. Napier

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Page 29 - Three poets in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn; The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go, To make a third she joined the former two.
Page 26 - Hermit hoar, in solemn cell, Wearing out life's evening gray; Strike thy bosom sage! and tell, What is bliss, and which the way ? Thus I spoke, and speaking sigh'd, Scarce repress'd the starting tear, When the hoary Sage reply'd, Come, my lad, and drink some beer.
Page 389 - I had exhausted all the art of pleasing which a retired and uncourtly scholar can possess. I had done all that I could ; and no man is well pleased to have his all neglected, be it ever so little. Seven years, my lord...
Page 23 - Tis as the general pulse Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause; An awful pause! prophetic of her end.
Page 4 - The acceptance of an American Dictionary in England has itself had immense effect in keeping up the community of speech, to break which would be a grievous harm, not to English-speaking nations alone, but to mankind. The result of this has been that the common Dictionary must suit both sides of the Atlantic.
Page 389 - I have been lately informed by the proprietor of ' The World,' that two papers, in which my ' Dictionary ' is recommended to the public, were written by your lordship. To be so distinguished, is an honour, which, being very little accustomed to favours from the great, I know not well how to receive, or in what terms to acknowledge. " When, upon some slight encouragement, I first visited your lordship, I was overpowered, like...
Page 361 - ... wherever human nature is to be found, there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason; and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced, in most countries, their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
Page 5 - Dr. Richardson's Philological Dictionary of the ENGLISH LANGUAGE. Combining Explanation with Etymology, and copiously illustrated by Quotations from the Best Authorities. New Edition, with a Supplement containing additional Words and further Illustrations. In 2 vols.

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