Report of the Annual Meeting, Volume 40

Front Cover
J. Murray., 1871 - Science
 

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Contents

Report of the Committee appointed for the purpose of calling the atten
9
Sixth Report of the Committee for Exploring Kents Cavern Devon
16
Third Report of the Committee for the purpose of investigating the rate
29
Second Report of the Committee appointed to get cut and prepared
41
Second Report of the Committee consisting of C W Merriftlld
44
Report of the Committee on the Treatment and Utilization of Sewage
49
Report on Observations of Luminous Meteors 180970 By a Com
76
Report on Recent Progress in Elliptic and Hyperelliptic Functions
102
Prof T II Huxley on the relations of PenicUlium Torula and Bacterium 1
110
Committee for the purpose of promoting the extension improvement
120
Dr Catons Contribution to the Migration Theory
134
On a New Steampower Meter By Messrs Ashton and Storey
151
Report of the Rainfall Committee for the Year 186970 consisting
170
Dr Thomas De Meschin on the Impolicy on economic grounds of convert
190
Mr W Hope on the History of the Shell that won the Battle of Sedan
219
Report on tho Heat generated in the Blood in the process of Artcria
228
Mr William Carruthf rs on the Sporangia of Ferns from the Coalmea
235
NOTICES AND ABSTRACTS
1
Professor A Cayley on the Problem of the inandcircuniscribed Triangle 9
9
Mr William Spottiswoode on Musical Intervals 15
15
Dr W J Macquorn Rankines Investigation of the Mathematical Theory
18
The Rev R Main on Shootingstars 24
24
Mr Charles Chambers on Rainfallits Variation with Elevation of
30
Professor J Henry on the Rainfall of the United States 36
36
Whiteside Cook on certain Objections to the Dynamic Theory
38
W M Watts on two Spectra of Carbon existing at the same Temperature 44
44
Mr J Fknwick Allen on the Alloys of Copper Tin Zinc Lead and other
50
Mr W C MIntoshs Preliminary Report on certain Annelids dredged in
121
Mr Robert Swinhoe on the Natural History of Hainan 128
128
Mr Frederic T Mott on the Scientific Value of Physical Beauty 134
134
Professor John Cleland on the Physical Relations of Consciousness and
135
Mr E Ray Lankestee on the Action of somo Gases and Vapours on
142
Mr W Boyd Dawkins and Geobge Busk on the Discovery of Platycnemic
148
Professor P Martin Duncan on the Geological Changes which have Occurred
149
Mr J S Phene on a recent Examination of British Tumuli and Monuments
155
Sir Samuel Bakers Letter from the White Nile 166
166
Lord Milton on Railway Routes across North America and the Physical
172
Colonel H Yules Notes on Analogies of Manners between the IndoChinese
178
Mr R Dudley Baxter on National Debts 187
187
Mr Alfred Havtland on a Proposed Rearrangement of the Begistration
193
Mr J Parry on Baths and Washhouses 197
197
Mr Thomas A Welton on Immigration and Emigration as affecting
203
Mr Gustav Bischop jun on a New System of Testing the Quality of
209
Mr Richard Eaton on certain Economical Improvements in obtaining Motive
215
Mr William P Marshall on the MartiniHenry and WestleyRichards
221
Mr Robkbt Sabine Pneumatic Dispatch On Pneumatic Transmission
227
to Accidental Causes 134
236
Dr Leith Adams on Newly discovered Species of Elephants 00
240
Mr Albany Hancocks Note on the Larval State of Molyula with Descrip
242
Mr W H L Russell on Linear Differential Equations 10
10
Prof J Clerk Maxwell on Hills and Dales 17
17
Mr Charles Brookes Queries respecting Ether 30
30
Mr James Bryce on the Matrix of the Gold in the Scottish Goldfields 70
70

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Page lxxix - But the great tragedy of Science — the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact...
Page lxxxiii - But expectation is permissible where belief is not ; and, if it were given me to look beyond the abyss of geologically recorded time to the still more remote period when the earth was passing through physical and chemical conditions, which it can no more see again than a man can recall his infancy, I should expect to be a witness of the evolution of living protoplasm from not living matter.
Page xviii - Committee two years in advance ; and the arrangements for it shall be entrusted to the Officers of the Association. General Committee. The General Committee shall sit during the week of the Meeting, or longer, to transact the business of the Association. It shall consist of the following persons : — CLASS A.
Page 255 - D. Brewster, Reports respecting the Two Series of Hourly Meteorological Observations kept in Scotland ; — Report on the subject of a series of Resolutions adopted by the British Association at their Meeting in August 1838, at Newcastle ; — R.
Page 2 - The Gods, who haunt The lucid interspace of world and world, Where never creeps a cloud, or moves a wind, Nor ever falls the least white star of snow, Nor ever lowest roll of thunder moans, Nor sound of human sorrow mounts to mar Their sacred everlasting calm!
Page lxxxviii - There can be no reason, then, for doubting that, among insects, contagious and infectious diseases of great malignity are caused by minute organisms which are produced from pre-existing germs, or by homogenesis ; and there is no reason, that I know of, for believing that what happens in insects may not take place in the highest animals. Indeed, there is already strong evidence that some diseases of an extremely malignant and fatal character, to which man is subject, are as much the work of minute...
Page 257 - CONTENTS : — Seventh Report of a Committee appointed to conduct the Cooperation of the British Association in the System of Simultaneous Magnetical and Meteorological Observations ; — Lt.-Col.
Page lxxxix - And thus mankind will have one more admonition that " the people perish for lack of knowledge ;" and that the alleviation of the miseries, and the promotion of the welfare, of men must be sought, by those who will not lose their pains, in that diligent, patient, loving study of all the nmltitudinous aspects of Nature, the results of which constitute exact knowledge, or Science.
Page lxxxiii - ... and this hole is soldered up when all the air in the case has been replaced by steam. By this method they may be kept for years, without putrefying, fermenting or getting mouldy. Now this is not because oxygen is excluded, inasmuch as it is now proved that free oxygen is not necessary for either fermentation or putrefaction. It is not because the tins are exhausted of air, for Vibriones and Bacteria live, as Pasteur has shown, without air or free oxygen.
Page 173 - And a river went out of Eden to water the garden; and from thence it was parted, and became into four heads. The name of the first is Pison : that is it which compasseth the whole land of Havilah, where there is gold ; and the gold of that land is good : there is bdellium and the onyx stone.

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